Salt Lake’s Olympic bid gets boost from new IOC selection process

FILE – Fraser Bullock, chief operating officer of the 2002 Winter Games, center, talks about the Olympics returning after the USOC choose Salt Lake over Denver to bid on behalf of the US for future Winter Games, during a press conference at the City County Building Friday in Salt Lake City on Friday, Dec. 14, 2018.
Steve Griffin, Deseret News
FILE – Gov. Gary Herbert, center, talks with Fraser Bullock, chief operating officer of the 2002 Winter Games, after the USOC choose Salt Lake over Denver to bid on behalf of the US for future Winter Games. Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski held a press conference outside her office to announce the news at the City County Building Friday in Salt Lake City on Friday, Dec. 14, 2018.
Steve Griffin, Deseret News
FILE – Fireworks explode during the 2002 Winter Olympic Games closing ceremony Sunday, Feb 24, 2002 at Rice-Eccles Stadium.
Scott G. Winterton, Deseret News
FILE – This Feb. 8, 2002, file photo, shows U.S. champion Michelle Kwan practicing for the women’s short program for the Winter Olympic Games at the Salt lake Ice Center in Salt Lake City.
Doug Mills, Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — The chances of Salt Lake City getting another Winter Games got a boost Wednesday with the International Olympic Committee’s move to a more flexible bidding process focused on finding enthusiastic host cities.

“It magnifies our strengths and we play right into what they’re looking for,” said Fraser Bullock, chief operating officer of the 2002 Winter Games in Salt Lake City and a leader of the effort to bring the Olympics back. “It has to be when, not if.”

Salt Lake City was selected late last year as the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee’s choice to bid on behalf of the United States for an unspecified future Winter Games, possibly as soon as 2030.

FILE - Gov. Gary Herbert, center, talks with Fraser Bullock, chief operating officer of the 2002 Winter Games, after the USOC choose Salt Lake over Denver to bid on behalf of the US for future Winter Games. Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski held a press conference outside her office to announce the news at the City County Building Friday in Salt Lake City on Friday, Dec. 14, 2018.

Steve Griffin, Deseret News

FILE – Gov. Gary Herbert, center, talks with Fraser Bullock, chief operating officer of the 2002 Winter Games, after the USOC choose Salt Lake over Denver to bid on behalf of the US for future Winter Games. Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski held a press conference outside her office to announce the news at the City County Building Friday in Salt Lake City on Friday, Dec. 14, 2018.

Bullock said Salt Lake City will benefit from the new process because of the high level of public support, seen in a 2018 USOPC poll that found more than 80% of Utahns backed the bid.

IOC members meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland, adopted a new process that does away with deadlines and other formalities just two days after naming Milan-Cortina in norther Italy as the host of the 2026 Winter Olympics.

Now, separate Winter and Summer Games commissions will be responsible for recommending and even recruiting future Olympic hosts, but only after gauging public support for an event with a price tag measured in billions of dollars.

“We can’t, I suggest, continue to be damaged as we have been in the past,” Australian IOC member John Coates said during his presentation on the process, referring to cities that have dropped their bids after losing at the polls.

Last November, voters in Calgary, Canada, rejected bidding for the 2026 Games, forcing the city to pull out of the running and increasing concern others might follow suit. That led to speculation the IOC could turn to Salt Lake City for 2026.

But Milan-Cortina and Stockholm, Sweden, stayed in the race. A factor cited in the Italian victory was greater support there for hosting an Olympics than in Sweden’s capital, as determined by IOC polling.

FILE - Fireworks explode during the 2002 Winter Olympic Games closing ceremony Sunday, Feb 24, 2002 at Rice-Eccles Stadium.

Scott G. Winterton, Deseret News

FILE – Fireworks explode during the 2002 Winter Olympic Games closing ceremony Sunday, Feb 24, 2002 at Rice-Eccles Stadium.

What’s being called the Future Host Commission should be satisfied there is solid support for a bid, including the needed legal and financial guarantees, before advancing it to IOC leaders, Coates said.

“We have to avoid too many losers,” he said, repeating a statement first made by IOC President Thomas Bach when the decision was made to award two Summer Games at the same time, 2024 to Paris, and 2028 to Los Angeles.

That could mean the new commission sorts through bid cities and recommends one host now while others are encouraged to keep working toward the next Olympics or beyond, creating a pipeline of potential picks.

Just when those recommendations would come is also up to the new commission. The IOC’s action Wednesday eliminated the language in the Olympic Charter requiring bid cities to be named seven years before the Games.

Changes also address other cities, regions and even countries being considered hosts and allowing for more existing facilities and infrastructure to cut the costs of an Olympics.

That came up in the competition to be named the U.S. Winter Games candidate when Denver proposed as an option holding some competitions in Utahinstead of building a bobsled, luge and skeleton track or other costly venues.

Coates told the IOC members that a bid with all of the competition venues close enough together that athletes can all be housed in a single Olympic village — as Salt Lake would do again in a future Games — is “utopia. That’s what we want.”

But he also made it clear that the strongest initial bid is not guaranteed a Games, after some IOC members raised concerns that without a more defined process, some cities not ready to bid right away could lose out.

FILE - This Feb. 8, 2002, file photo, shows U.S. champion Michelle Kwan practicing for the women's short program for the Winter Olympic Games at the Salt lake Ice Center in Salt Lake City.

Doug Mills, Associated Press

FILE – This Feb. 8, 2002, file photo, shows U.S. champion Michelle Kwan practicing for the women's short program for the Winter Olympic Games at the Salt lake Ice Center in Salt Lake City.

“If they get one outstanding bid, I think it would be very wrong to suddenly present it” for quick approval, Coates said. Instead, a strong bid should be used to remind other cities they “need to get cracking.”

Salt Lake City was not mentioned by name in Wednesday’s discussion, but during a news conference later, Bach described Sapporo as a contender for 2030, after the Japanese city withdrew from the 2026 race following an earthquake.

“This city has our telephone number,” Bach said when a Japanese reporter asked whether the new process offered any advantages to the bid. “We will, of course, look at different options. But it’s also no secret” Sapporo intends to bid again.

The new process, Bach said, means “we can start having a conversation with Sapporo and other interested cities that have also already, in a more or less formal way, indicated their interest.”

He also suggested Stockholm could come back for another bid.

Before the IOC starts talking with potential Olympic hosts, the details of the process need to be worked out and the members of the commissions named. Bullock said Salt Lake will wait for direction from the national Olympic committee.

“I don’t believe the IOC is ready today to start a dialog but now they have a plan,” he said, anticipating it will take several months to put the finishing touches on the new bid process.

The U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee had little to say about the specifics of what’s next for Salt Lake City.

“We very much want to host the Olympic Winter Games again in the U.S., and when we believe the time is right, Salt Lake City will be our partner,” spokesman Mark Jones said in a statement to the Deseret News.

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Ex-BYU golfer Zac Blair is as dedicated to golf as ever as he plays this week at Utah Championship

Zac Blair watches his tee shot form the 17th tee during the third round of the Quicken Loans National golf tournament, Saturday, June 30, 2018, in Potomac, Md.
Nick Wass, FR67404 AP

FARMINGTON — For Zac Blair, it was the most heartbreaking of times, just two years ago, in August 2017 when he realized one lousy stroke over an entire season would have made a big difference in his future.

The Ogden native and former BYU star was in good position to earn his PGA Tour card for the fourth straight year, only to lose it by the slimmest of margins — one point — on the final FedEx Cup standings list and finish in the dreaded No. 126 spot. Only the top 125 earn automatic exemptions for the following year.

The way it happened was especially excruciating, as one player made a hole-in-one and a birdie on his final three holes to pass him up, another shot a final-round 64 to move past him and J.J. Henry, who ended up at 125, birdied his final hole to barely pass Blair up.

“It definitely stings,” Blair said at the time, “seeing a guy make a hole-in-one and another birdie on the last hole to keep you out by a point.”

Blair still had some partial status in 2018 and was able to play in 20 tournaments, but didn’t earn enough points to get back in the top 125, which put him on the Korn Ferry Tour this year.

“You’d rather be up on the big tour for sure, but it is what it is. It goes along the lines of how important every shot is. It’s part of golf, you’ve just got to play good and get back out there where you want to be.”

Former BYU golfer Zac Blair

As he plays in this week’s Utah Championship at Oakridge Country Club Thursday through Sunday, it’s Blair’s first extended experience on the “Triple-A Tour.” He played just two months on what was then called the Web.com Tour, thanks to a second-place finish in the season-ending Web.com Tour Championship.

The 28-year-old, who lives in Orem with his wife Alicia and their two dogs, tees off at 8:25 a.m. Thursday. He’s played in 15 events this year, finishing in the top 10 twice, a tie for eighth in the opening event in the Bahamas and a tie for sixth in Alabama in April. He’s made nine cuts and stands in 62nd place on the Korn Ferry points list. If he can move into the top 25, he’ll regain his PGA Tour card and he needs to stay in the top 75 to qualify for the season-ending Tour Championship.

“It’s like any other tournament, you’ve got to go out and try to play well,” he said. “I’ve played here a lot, some Utah Opens and some other tournaments. If you play good, you’re comfortable, you know the course, but you’ve still got to go out and execute.”

Blair says he doesn’t look back and lament about his disappointment in 2017.

“You’d rather be up on the big tour for sure, but it is what it is,” he said. “It goes along the lines of how important every shot is. It’s part of golf, you’ve just got to play good and get back out there where you want to be.”

Two weeks ago, Blair played in the U.S. Open for the second time, after finishing in a tie for 40th place at the Open five years ago. This time it didn’t go so well, after he got off to a horrendous start, going 9-over par on his first eight holes and ending up with scores of 83 and 72.

Blair, a social media junkie, was criticized by some for posting pictures of himself playing on the beach with his dog the morning of his first round and later in the week he tweeted out that he was going to “retire” from being a golf course architect and merchandiser and “focus on professional golf.” That was referring to “The Buck Club,” a yet-to-be-built golf club that already has 15,000-plus Twitter followers with a wide variety of hats, belts and head covers that are already available for purchase.

However, Blair said he wasn’t being serious, as his Buck Club twitter account with new products showing up every day, attests, and that he’s as dedicated to golf as much as ever.

“It was more of a joke,” he said this week before a pro-am at Oakridge. “I’m pretty dedicated to golf. Anybody that knows me, knows I love golf.”

He said if he has a good week, no one says anything about his off-the-course activities.

“When you have a bad week, they wonder why you’re not out practicing or doing this,” he said. “People just don’t see it. It’s easy for people on the outside to look in and say stuff. I do what I do.”

His Buck Club course will be built somewhere in northern Utah at an undisclosed location, but still may be a few years away from realization.

“It’s been going good,” he said. “We’re in no big rush to get it done. It takes time and do the right things and (get the) right people involved and when it happens it will be a cool place.”

TOURNEY NOTES: Mike Weir, who is able to play the Korn Ferry Tour this year as a 49-year-old former PGA Tour winner, will not be back at Oakridge for the second straight year as he was able to get into the PGA Tour’s Rocket Mortgage Classic in Detroit this week, which is just 75 miles from his hometown of Bright’s Grove, Ontario. … Former U.S. Open and Masters champion Angel Cabrera is in the field. The 49-year-old Argentine who is gearing up for the Champions Tour, which he is eligible for later this year, tees off at 7:45 Thursday. … Preston Summerhays, the 16-year-old reigning Utah State Amateur champion tees off at 9:15 a.m. Thursday, while his uncle, Daniel Summerhays, tees off at 1:20 p.m. Park City pro Steele DeWald goes off at 2:30 p.m. … Nelson Ledesma, ranked No. 18 on the Korn Ferry points list, withdrew Wednesday.

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Salt Lake City mayor issues budget vetoes over City Council’s affordable housing approach

FILE – Salt Lake City Mayor Jacki Biskupski speaks at a press conference at the City and County Building in Salt Lake City about a lawsuit filed against the Utah Inland Port Authority on Monday, June 24, 2019. Biskupski and the City Council are at odds after the council shifted and placed contingencies on about $4 million in affordable housing and homelessness money.
Scott G Winterton, Deseret News

SALT LAKE CITY — Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski issued her first budget vetoes on Tuesday, contesting the City Council’s budget approach to about $4 million in affordable housing and homelessness money — but her vetoes might be overridden.

While Biskupski argues the council’s budget would slow down funding for housing and homelessness programs, City Council members say their budget did not slow down the process and would rather create a more streamlined and transparent process.

The City Council is expected to convene for a potential veto override session on Friday, according to a joint City Council statement issued Tuesday. In the statement, City Councilman Charlie Luke and City Councilwoman Amy Fowler, who is also chairwoman of the city’s Redevelopment Agency, called Biskupski’s vetoes “expected.”

“This budget does not slow down the process, and we have confidence the RDA staff and other city agencies can move forward on the accelerated timeline we have for affordable housing,” the statement said.

Biskupski in a veto statement sent to the City Council said while she and the council are committed to increasing affordable housing in the city, she worried the council’s decision to shift about $2.6 million from the city’s Housing Trust Fund to the Redevelopment Agency (a body controlled by the City Council) and contingencies placed on $1.9 million of funding for affordable housing programs would bog down the “critical” funding.

The mayor vetoed both line items.

“It is important to note, that while we may disagree on how we should move forward over the next year to address the housing crisis, we do not disagree that we must,” Biskupski said.

The City Council during its budget deliberations supported Biskupski’s allocations for affordable housing, but decided to move the city’s Housing Trust Fund, which has been used to build or preserve affordable housing units, from the city’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division and put it under the control of the RDA so developers wouldn’t need to submit multiple applications for funding.

The aim, after a yearlong trial period, would be to divide the trust fund in two, with the RDA controlling lending for housing development while the city’s Housing and Neighborhood Development Division would control funding for housing programs.

To Biskupski, that move could slow down the process. She called the Housing Trust Fund already “transparent and effective,” noting that every loan issued is first reviewed by an advisory board, then the City Council.

“Shifting the funding to the RDA through an as of yet (undefined) process will inevitably slow down the delivery of this critical financing,” Biskupski said. “With the region poised to begin implementing a new service model for homelessness, now is not the time to create any delays in bringing additional affordable housing online.”

Additionally, the City Council opted to put about $1.9 million for homelessness programs into a holding account, only to be released after the council could hash out more details with the mayor’s administration on exactly how the money would be spent.

Biskupski argued against the hold on the money, saying there’s an “immediate need” while pointing to the Road Home’s New House 2020 program, which provides case management and housing assistance to people experiencing homelessness who are the highest users of emergency services.

“The council’s decision to place funding in a holding account will jeopardize case management services because funding for this long-term program lapses June 30,” the mayor said.

Luke and Fowler in Tuesday’s statement said they look forward to discussing the issue during Friday’s meeting.

“There are a number of inaccuracies in the mayor’s veto statement, which we will address in detail,” Luke and Fowler said.

A supermajority, or five out of seven votes, on the council is required to override the mayor’s vetoes. The Salt Lake City Council unanimously approved the budget earlier this month.

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How often will women get interrupted in the Democratic primary debates?

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren holds a town hall on the Florida International University campus on Tuesday, June 25, 2019, in Miami. Warren will participate in the Democratic presidential debates this week.
Jennifer King, Miami Herald

SALT LAKE CITY — On each of the next two nights of the Democratic primary debate, three women will share the stage with seven male candidates.

The debate was split over Wednesday and Thursday nights because of the number of qualifying candidates, with top polling candidates evenly divided over the two groups. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar will debate on the first night, according to NBC News.

Numerous studies have shown that women are often interrupted by men and by other women in all kinds of environments — from the Supreme Court to school board meetings. They are also “often given less credit, or even penalized, for being outspoken,” according to Vox.

That has many people wondering — will the male candidates on stage this week try to speak over the women?

Debate coach Christine Jahnke told The Washington Post that women might have to turn the tables and interrupt a man if they want to get noticed in the crowded debate.

“The moderators probably won’t allow any direct interchange between the candidates. So it may boil down to being willing to interrupt someone while they’re talking,” she said.

“The question for the audience (is) — did they interpret that as an attempt of a male candidate to disadvantage a female candidate?”

Kathleen Hall Jamieson, a professor of communications at the University of Pennsylvania

But if men interrupt women in the debate, they could invite an unwelcome comparison to President Donald Trump.

In 2016, news outlets reported that Trump had a habit of speaking over women, including interrupting Hillary Clinton 51 times in one debate while she interrupted him 17 times, according to PBS.

“The question for the audience (is) — did they interpret that as an attempt of a male candidate to disadvantage a female candidate?” Kathleen Hall Jamieson, a professor of communications at the University of Pennsylvania, told PBS at the time.

While the interruptions clearly didn’t prevent Trump from getting elected, Democrats don’t want to use the president’s debate tactics, according to Time.

Tali Mendelberg and Christopher Karpowitz, professors at Princeton and Brigham Young University, respectively, conducted a study that found men tend to speak more than women in groups, but “once women made up 60 to 80 percent of a group, they spoke as much as men,” according to The New York Times.

With women making up just 30% of the speakers in both debates this week, the odds are in favor of men speaking over them.

However, Warren will be on stage, and she is polling right behind Sen. Bernie Sanders, according to FiveThirtyEight. As Tim Murphy, a reporter with Mother Jones, pointed out, “her experience as both a witness and interrogator at Capitol Hill hearings offer a glimpse of how she could perform not just against her fellow Democrats but also, if she gets that far, against Trump.”

“Even when women reach such a high pinnacle in their profession, they are interrupted by men, not only their colleagues, but also their explicit subordinates.”

Tonja Jacobi, a professor at Northwestern University, told the South China Morning Post.

Gabbard and Klobuchar are also unlikely to be steamrolled. Gabbard is a veteran who was deployed in Iraq and Kuwait, according to New York Magazine. She was elected as a representative to the Hawaii state legislature at just 21 years old.

Klobuchar was a prosecutor in Minnesota, known for her tough on crime approach, for which she has been widely criticized but has not apologized, Voxreported.

Of course, Clinton was also a politician with decades of experience and didn’t seem like a likely candidate for repeated interruptions.

“Even when women reach such a high pinnacle in their profession, they are interrupted by men, not only their colleagues, but also their explicit subordinates,” Tonja Jacobi, a professor at Northwestern University, told the South China Morning Post.

And while the female Democratic candidates can try to do their own share of interrupting, it is usually perceived negatively, according to Forbesauthor and women’s career coach Kathy Caprino.

However, as experts explained to the South China Morning Post, sometimes the backlash is worth it, and there are things women can do to offset it. For example, they can jump in, speak quickly, and if someone tries to wrest attention from them, ask to be allowed to finish.

Gabbard and Klobuchar will both need to make the most of the first debate, as both are polling at roughly 1%. With so many candidates on the stage, they likely won’t have much time to make their points. Any interruptions could cut into valuable opportunities to make their voices and views known to the American people.

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Parents of slain athlete Lauren McCluskey intend to sue University of Utah

Lauren McCluskey, a member of the University of Utah track team, is pictured on Aug. 30, 2017, in Salt Lake City. McCluskey, 21, was shot and killed on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018.
University of Utah

SALT LAKE CITY — The parents of slain University of Utah student Lauren McCluskey have announced their intention to sue the school.

Jill and Matt McCluskey said in a prepared statement Wednesday that they will file a legal complaint against the University of Utah “as a result of the university failing to protect student and daughter Lauren McCluskey. Lauren was murdered on campus in October of 2018 despite calling University of Utah Campus Police more than 20 times for help leading up to her murder.”

The McCluskeys plan to hold a press conference in Salt Lake City on Thursday after the complaint is filed.

A legal complaint is the opening filing in a civil lawsuit.

Lauren McCluskey, 21, was shot and killed on Oct. 22 near her campus dorm by Melvin Shawn Rowland, 37, a convicted sex offender who was on the Utah Sex Offender Registry at the time of the killing. Rowland and McCluskey had gone out on dates, but she soon discovered he had lied to her about his name and age.

When McCluskey found out who he really was, she told police that Rowland attempted to blackmail her by demanding money in exchange for not distributing intimate pictures of her.

From Oct. 10 until her death, McCluskey made multiple calls to the U. police department. She even called Salt Lake police in hopes of quicker action. But university police never conducted a full background check on Rowland, who was on the Utah Sex Offender Registry and had served many years in the Utah State Prison, and at least one call made by McCluskey to the officer assigned to her case went to voicemail because the officer was not on duty.

A three-member independent review panel found numerous mistakes were made by the university and by campus police, but concluded that it was impossible to say whether McCluskey’s death could have been prevented. McCluskey’s parents, however, have been very vocal since their daughter’s killing in expressing their belief that her death was preventable and the university didn’t do enough to help her.

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Theater review: Does ‘Rent’ still hold up in 2019? We found out at Salt Lake’s Eccles Theater

The company of the “Rent” 20th anniversary tour. Chase McCall, bottom right, who was born in Salt Lake, plays Steve.
Carol Rosegg
The company of the “Rent” 20th anniversary tour. “Rent” won three Tony Awards when it opened on Broadway in 1996.
Carol Rosegg
The company of the “Rent” 20th anniversary tour. The tour performs with the original staging, set and choreography.
Carol Rosegg

RENT,” U.S. tour, through June 30, Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main (801-355-2787 or artsaltlake.org); running time: 2 hours, 40 minutes (one intermission)

SALT LAKE CITY — On the surface, “Rent” is a totally ’90s musical. Everyone’s dressed in baggy jeans like they’re in a bad boy band video, or in tight, rock attire like they’re attending a show at CBGB and about to embrace the jagged pill that is ’90s grunge music.

Fast forward 20 years from the show’s initial run and the story still holds up, and may even be more relevent in 2019 than you’d expect.

Rent” opened Tuesday night at Salt Lake’s Eccles Theater as a part of its 20th anniversary tour, and nearly all of the cast members hit the high marks set by the show’s original Broadway cast — a tough task, to say the least — and offered a show that stands up to the original.

With a story based on Puccini’s 19th-century opera “La Bohème,” “Rent” tells the story of angsty young adults struggling to pay their rent and worrying about a cyber arts studio coming to their impoverished neighborhood. Their challenges should be familiar to anyone in their 20s (or beyond): The pain of rising rent prices, a shrinking middle class and weighing whether or not to pursue creative dreams or go with the job that makes the most money.

That last issue is explored in the storyline of Mark Cohen (Logan Marks), who also functions as “Rent’s” narrator. Mark sells his riot video footage to a place called Buzz Line, which sounds not unlike a popular news/pop culture website of the modern era. One of the show’s closing numbers, “Living in America,” described the challenges of figuring out our place in a society that’s isolating and alienating — a discussion point still relevant today as the prevalence of streaming sites that isolate us from social gatherings that, at another time, we might have embraced.

The company of the "Rent" 20th anniversary tour. "Rent" won three Tony Awards when it opened on Broadway in 1996.

Carol Rosegg

The company of the "Rent" 20th anniversary tour. "Rent" won three Tony Awards when it opened on Broadway in 1996.

In addition to its strong messages, the Broadway touring production of “Rent” also boasts a diverse cast that fits pleasantly well in 2019’s call for, well, more diverse actors, actresses, directors and writers. Strong female characters dominated the stage on Tuesday night. Fickle Maureen Johnson (Lyndie Moe), in her patched bell-bottom jeans, and Joanne Jefferson (Lencia Kebede) owned their story, an at-times fraught romance. Moe had the crowd singing along during her rendition of “Over the Moon,” and Kebede’s natural charisma and acting chops were some of most powerful of the night.

Not to be outdone, Javon King’s performance as the gender fluid and wonderfully upbeat Angel Schunard wowed the crowd. King’s intense dance moves, smooth drum playing and incredible comedic timing won over the audience and had people cheering him on throughout.

Tuesday night’s male actors offered a lighter, softer touch to traditionally more aggressive portrayals, especially with Marks’ turn as Mark Cohen. His comedic timing and playfulness with the story made this grungy show light-spirited at multiple points, and Marks innocence and hopefulness certainly kept the show from delving too far into the dark territory it most certainly explores.

That said, whenever he had words of affirmation and love toward Mimi, the audience was quick to believe. The gentler touch provided a new rendition of the character who is primarily seen as aggressive and overly dramatic.

Joshua Bess’s Roger Davis was also much softer than the role is usually played. The former rock star Roger is meant to be angry and vengeful that his career and life took a turn for the worst. He’s angry, upset, full of rage. But Bess, though a tremendously gifted singer and stage performer, presented a softer Roger than the role asks for. It was hard to believe his anger at Mark, Mimi, or whoever else he approached because of his softer tone.

The company of the "Rent" 20th anniversary tour. The tour performs with the original staging, set and choreography.

Carol Rosegg

The company of the "Rent" 20th anniversary tour. The tour performs with the original staging, set and choreography.

Perhaps the night’s best male performance came from Devinre Adams, whose character Tom Collins represents the soul of the show. His “I’ll Cover You” reprise at a highly emotional moment ignited sniffles and tears from audience members. He put everything he had into his role, and he raw emotion was easily noticeable. He let it all out there.

The company for this “Rent” show still has some kinks to work out. There were a few moments where the cast members weren’t completely in sync, and there were brief blips from the sound and microphones at the Eccles that will figure themselves out as the run continues.

And it’s no surprise that “Rent” isn’t meant for a family audience. It’s a highly sexualized musical that discusses mature themes. There’s a brief moment of nudity, too, and plenty of crass innuendos and jokes throughout the play that will turn away those interested in family appropriate plays.

But “Rent” — despite taking place in the early ’90s and having had its first run almost 20 years ago — is a musical worthy of this contemporary tour. Tuesday night’s production had a strong and diverse cast of characters who showed their true emotions — they sang about their fears, their worries and their anxieties, many of which still plague modern adults. And besides, no matter the era, there will always be time for a season of love.

Content advisory: “Rent” contains partial nudity, sexual innuendos, mature themes and strong language.

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Utah Jazz assistant Fotis Katsikaris agrees to return to Spain as head coach of Gran Canaria

FILE: Greece’s Fotis Katsikaris gestures during the EuroBasket European Basketball Championship quarterfinal match, between Spain against Greece, at Pierre Mauroy stadium in Lille, northern France, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015. Katsikaris, who was hired as an assistant by the Utah Jazz last summer, is returning overseas to coach.
AP

SALT LAKE CITY — The Cleveland Cavaliers introduced former Utah Jazz assistant Antonio Lang last Wednesday as its newest assistant to join new head coach John Beilein’s coaching staff.

Now, exactly one week later, another one of Jazz head coach Quin Snyder’s assistants, Fotis Katsikaris, has accepted a new opportunity to return overseas.

Katsikaris has agreed to a two-year deal as the head coach of Herbalife Gran Canaria in Spain after spending one season in Utah.

“Fotis Katsikaris was a tremendous addition to our staff this past season and we thank him for his contributions to our organization,” said Jazz coach Quin Snyder.

“Returning to the ACB League as a head coach, where he had a great career in the past, is an incredible opportunity,” he continued. “While I know what a difficult decision this was for him, we all look forward to following his success. Basketball is thriving as a global game and we will continue to grow with it as we explore opportunities to learn from international coaches.”

Katsikaris, a native of Korydallos, Greece, was the first-ever Greek NBA assistant coach. Prior to Utah, he served as head coach of Iberostar Tenerife of the Liga ACB in Spain plus coached the Greek National Team from 2014-16.

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