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Doctors Serving the Individuals of Utah

Discovering the right medical service provider can be hard. When you are trying to find the finest alternative for you and your liked ones, there are a great deal of aspects to think about. This was among the main factors that we began Utah Medical Professional Associates. We provide information about a few of the most highly evaluated and searched for doctor in Utah Our ideas are based on feedback from clients and info that can be found online about the service providers.

The State of the Medical Profession in Utah

Utah is certainly on the forefront of the medical market. It is a good family atmosphere and is a preferable location to live. This has permitted Utah to bring in a few of the biggest minds in medicine. With centers like Primary Children’s Healthcare facility, LDS Health center, and many other world-class medical centers, it is no surprise that individuals from all over the world concerned Utah to be treated for their illnesses.

The Dental Care Occupation in Utah

The oral health industry in Utah is likewise world class. Utah has a few of the most prominent dental training centers in the nation, not to discuss remarkable dental care service providers. The competitive atmosphere for dentistry has actually needed dentists to go above and beyond the call of task to contend for the company of the regional homeowners. This drives them to complete extra continuing education and supply exceptional customer support to each and every patient. If you are in need of a great dentist in Salt Lake City, we highly recommend Canyon Rim Dental Salt Lake.

Chiropractic Care and Spine Health in Utah.

Just like other medical classifications in Utah, Chiropractic care and spinal column health is no exception. There are numerous chiropractic doctors in Utah and most of them enjoy living here. This needs them to raise their care to a whole new level. You can expect that any chiropractic specialist who does not have extraordinary customer service abilities will not been around for too long in Utah.

Massage Providers

While it is not precisely a medical category, massage is a significant element in the total health of Utah homeowners. Whether a Utah citizen is seeking a massage for a sports injury, or merely for relaxation, massages are an important part of the wellness of Utah homeowners.

Best Activities to do if You are Spending a Day in Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City is a really quick paced city situated right in the heart of Utah. With a growing tech economy and the busy daily activities, it can be difficult to narrow in on the best things to do if you are going to. Because I hail Utah and grew up in the Salt Lake City area, let me do you a favor and offer you a few of the sites to see while you are in town.

Outdoor camping

If you are ideal in the middle of the Rocky Mountains, it just makes good sense to invest a minimum of one of your nights in the outdoors. With numerous camping spots to pick from, you must have the ability to discover something appropriate on nearly any night!

About Utah Medical Professional Associates Online

Utah Medical Professional Associates is a collection of viewpoints about medical and health care professionals in Utah. Readers should constantly perform their own due diligence and not rely solely on the viewpoints expressed in this, or any of our short articles.

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Canyon Rim Dental Salt Lake
2560 E 3300 S #200
Salt Lake City, UT 84109
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https://canyonrimdentalsaltlake.com

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Salt Lake City Best Businesses

Even in a beautiful setting like Salt Lake City crime is a hazard that both locals and visitors have to contend with on a daily basis. Unfortunately, even visitors can be caught up in a criminal situation unknowingly. At the Utah Freedom Fighters, we endeavor to provide excellent representation to all the clients seeking the services of a knowledgeable attorney for criminal defense cases in Salt Lake City. Reach out y visiting our offices at 175 Main St Ste 500, Salt Lake City, UT, 84111

Salt Lake City’s Volunteering Options

There are many options for visitors and locals alike who have a philanthropic heart. Volunteering is a huge part of the Salt Lake City culture which instills the value of giving back to society and caring for each other.

The Road Home is an organization that relies on the services of volunteers who help with programs and services targeting homeless families and individuals. The volunteers will help with the dinners, kids activities, and other scheduled programs. The Ronald McDonald is another incredible volunteering opportunity. It is a house that shelters parents and caregivers to children who have been hospitalized so that they can stay close to a sick child. This lifts a great burden from the shoulders of an ailing child’s parent as they do not have to think of the expense of accommodation.

Volunteering at the Primary Children’s Hospital will be very fulfilling seeing as it meets the needs of a very vulnerable population in our society. The Primary Children’s Hospital is committed providing the highest quality of medical care to the children under its care. The facility cares for children of all ages, backgrounds, and ethnicities while the volunteers are drawn from a broad spectrum of society.

Your volunteer work can also be in the events and races that are synonymous with Salt Lake City. Give your time at the Salt Lake City Marathon, Deseret News Marathon or the Ogden Marathon among many others. Such races are always looking for volunteers because of the huge number of participants drawn from various parts of the country.

Understandably, visitors may be more interested in the touristic attractions but you are encouraged to give a little of yourself back to the Salt Lake City community. It allows you to leave a part of yourself back in the city which will see you return again and again.

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Utah gun rights advocate appeals denial of attempt to block federal ban on bump stocks

SALT LAKE CITY — A Utah gun rights advocate Monday appealed a federal judge’s decision denying his request to block a pending nationwide ban on an accessory that modifies rifles to fire like automatic weapons.

Clark Aposhian, chairman of the Utah Shooting Sports Council, wants the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver to review last Friday’s ruling by U.S. District Judge Jill Parrish.

Parrish concluded that Aposhian didn’t show a “substantial likelihood” of winning the lawsuit he filed against the government on its merits and, as a result, denied his motion for a preliminary injunction.

Aposhian argues in the lawsuit that the Department of Justice and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives violated the Constitution in prohibiting a device known as a bump stock.

Bump stocks came under intense scrutiny after a gunman used them to kill 58 people at a country music concert in Las Vegas in 2017.

The Trump administration in late December adopted a new federal rule that redefined the devices as “machine guns,” therefore banning them under existing law. The rule directs owners to destroy or surrender their bump stocks to the ATF before it takes effect March 26.

Aposhian contends the government is illegally changing the rules in the middle of the game.

Parrish found neither the political impetus for the rule nor the fact that it reflects a change in ATF policy undermines its validity.

Rep. Patrice Arent, D-Millcreek, ran a bill to prohibit bump stocks in Utah during the legislative session that ended last week. The measure did not get out of committee.

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In our opinion: College admissions scandal is a gross lapse in integrity

The federal prosecution of an alleged multimillion-dollar bribery racket aimed at helping the kids of wealthy families get into prestigious colleges has exposed a culture of corruption stunning in its scope and shocking as to the depth of the legal and ethical depravity it reveals.

The case should prompt institutions of higher learning everywhere to undertake a review of their admissions policies in search of places where outright cheating and influence peddling can give financially privileged students an edge over those who deserve entrance based on merit.

An integral part of the alleged scheme involves the manipulation of scores on the SAT, a primary component of an admissions application. That SAT scores can be so easily massaged raises the question as to their ultimate value as a marker for college entrance. It also demands that test designers and administrators do what they can in the wake of the scandal to assure the integrity of the testing process.

Most disturbing is the staggering level of ethical desertion demonstrated by those who would offer bribes in exchange for granting admission, and by those who would accept them. A high-level official at the University of Southern California’s athletic department is alleged to have taken more than $1 million in bribes over a period of years to open up slots in sports programs for students with no qualifications in the sport. Such behavior deserves to be met with rigorous prosecution and significant punishment.

The process of granting college entrance based on athletic ability has, in this scandal and in others, been shown to be ripe for abuse. Again, the question is raised as to whether U.S. institutions are putting too much emphasis on their sports programs, particularly to the extent that such emphasis might detract from investment in scholastic endeavors.

Unlike most criminal prosecutions, this case does not enumerate a particular victim, or class of victims. Truly qualified kids who were denied admission could certainly be regarded as victims, but it would be impossible to identify such individuals in the scope of a criminal prosecution. In the bigger picture, the scandal will certainly leave the institutions involved with significant scars, marking the inability of their leaders to protect their school’s integrity.

Also, there is the matter of overall fairness, and the lofty social objective of ensuring a level playing field for children. This scandal is particularly poignant at a time when many Americans feel the economic playing cards are stacked against them, and when a college education is increasingly vital as a vehicle for prosperity.

An institution of higher learning should function as a meritocracy in which hard work, talent and honest accomplishment are recognized and rewarded. When financial incentives trump merit, the system fails. This scandal demands more than soul-searching; it calls for a concerted effort among institutions and their governors to see that any such behavior, under any guise, is not tolerated.

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In honor of Women’s History Month, here are 9 Utah women you probably don’t know, but should

SALT LAKE CITY — March is Women’s History Month, which makes this a good time to celebrate impactful women throughout history. (Although there isn’t a bad time to celebrate people who have done meaningful things.)

Utah is no stranger to remarkable female leaders and innovators, even if their names aren’t familiar to most of us. To help us learn more about those that history has overlooked, we asked Naomi Watkins, director of education for Better Days 2020, to highlight nine forgotten women in Utah’s history.

“They were people who impacted our community and our state. They helped build it and make it what it is,” Watkins said in a recent phone interview.

Better Days 2020 is a local nonprofit that is working to teach Utahns about women’s history through educational curriculum for schools, family and individuals, and create films, books and a variety of artistic projects. 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of women first getting the vote in Utah — a first for any state in country — and is also the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which gave all U.S. women the right to vote.

Watkins hopes that in the future, Utah children will learn about these women and others in school.

“I think it’s really important for kids and people to see representations of themselves in the stories that we tell,” she said. “… It helps them see themselves as agents who can make a difference too.”

Here are nine women often forgotten in Utah’s history:

1. Charlotte Godbe Kirby (1837-1908)

Charlotte Godbe Kirby was a suffragette and advocate for women’s rights, and the first Utah woman to serve on the national suffrage committee as the Utah delegate to the National Woman’s Suffrage Educational Committee.

“The era of woman has begun and only in union is our strength. When earnest women can strike hands in fellowship and clasp them around the world in united effort, then … will men accept us as the power we have it in us to be,” Kirby wrote in an 1883 newspaper column.

A portrait of Jennie Froiseth by Brooke Smart.

Provided by Better Days 2020

A portrait of Jennie Froiseth by Brooke Smart.

2. Jennie Froiseth (1843-1930)

Another Utah woman prominent in the suffragist movement — she was friends with Julia Ward Howe and other national suffragettes — the Irish-born Jennie Froiseth also organized the first women’s literary club in Salt Lake City and was a passionate anti-polygamist.

3. Emma McVicker (1846-1916)

Utah’s first (and only for another 109 years) female state superintendent of schools, Emma McVicker worked her whole career to advance education for children and women. McVicker founded Utah’s first free public kindergarten, served as an official critic of the Utah Women’s Press Club, was a member of the Women’s Literary Club, secretary of the State Republican League and worked in the suffrage movement, helping to host Susan B. Anthony and Rev. Anna Shaw when they came to Utah in 1895.

4. Emily Richards (1850-1929)

When women in Utah first received the vote in 1870, prominent suffragette Emily Richards wrote for the Deseret News, “The work is but begun; the cause is in its merest infancy. That which remains to be done opens up before us in an almost endless vista. In a far away promised land we behold a perfected state wherein the heart and hand and intelligence of woman contribute their full share.”

With the help of Margaret Caine, Richards founded the Utah Woman Suffrage Association and worked to help Utah women gain entrance into national women’s suffrage groups. She served as Utah’s representative at the International and National Councils of Women at both Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition and the World’s Congress of Representative Women in 1893.

5. Hannah Kaaepa (1873-1918)

Hannah Kaaepa was born in Hawaii before immigrating to Utah in 1898 to live in Iosepa, Utah, a colony of native Hawaiian members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

In 1899, Kaaepa went with other Utah suffragists to Washington, D.C., for the third Triennial Congress of the National Council of Women. There, she spoke on behalf of Hawaiian women in support of Queen Liliuokalani, the Hawaiian Kingdom’s deposed queen and Kaaepa’s personal family friend.

The historian Helen Z. Papanikolas.

Deseret News archives

The historian Helen Z. Papanikolas.

6. Helen Papanikolas (1917-2004)

The daughter of Greek immigrants, historian Helen Papanikolas dedicated much of her life to gathering stories from Utah immigrants and other marginalized groups. She compiled and edited “The Peoples of Utah,” a history of nonwhite Utahns, and formed the Peoples of Utah Institute, a precursor for Salt Lake’s Hellenic Cultural Museum. Her work for a more inclusive history garnered many awards such as Japanese-American Citizens League Award and the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.

“Helen … was Greek,” Watkins said. “It’s because of her work that we know about a lot of these women who were in other communities besides communities (of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.) … We still use her work because she was one of the first people who did that.”

7. Alice Kasai (1916-2007)

Human rights advocate and civil rights leader Alice Kasai dedicated her life to advancing the conditions and lives of Japanese Americans and other marginalized groups in Utah. She served as the first woman president of the Japanese American Citizens League in Salt Lake, a role she took on while her husband was kept in a Japanese internment camp during World War II.

After he was released, the couple worked to found the International Peace Garden, completed in 1952, and the Sister City Project, which initially started as a student exchange program with Matsumoto, Japan, and now includes five additional cities.

“The intention that drove all her endeavors was her strong belief in the oneness of all humankind,” Kasai’s obituary read.

8. Mae Timbimboo Parry (1919-2007)

A portrait of Mae Timbimboo Parry by Brooke Smart.

Provided by Better Days 2020

A portrait of Mae Timbimboo Parry by Brooke Smart.

Utah native and Shoshone tribal historian Mae Timbimboo Parry was a powerful and visionary voice for her tribe. She recorded as many stories as she could collect from her tribal elders and family members, helping to tell different sides of important historical events. Parry served on the White House Council for Indian Tribal Affairs that worked to facilitate and coordinate federal programs and resources for her tribe and others. In addition to her community and tribal work, she also was named “Utah Honorary Mother of the Year” in 1986.

“Mae shaped the story of her people and changed the narrative to be more reflective of their perspective as opposed to white settlers perspective,” Watkins said.

9. Barbara Toomer (1929-2018)

Barbara Toomer started her career as a nurse, but after contracting polio and subsequently being confined to a wheelchair, Toomer became a passionate advocate for the rights of people with disabilities. Co-founder of the Utah Independent Living Center, she also helped organize Advocates for Utah Handicapped and was heavily involved with Americans Disabled for Accessible Public Transit, working to organize nonviolent protests for the Utah Transit Authority to be accessible to people with disabilities. During one protest, participents chained themselves to local buses, forcing all bus routes in Salt Lake to shut down. Toomer continued to fight for these rights despite being jailed at least 35 times.

Barbara Toomer talks to members of the media outside the Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, March 21, 2017, about the dangers of eliminating Medicaid and Affordable Care Act protections.

Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

Barbara Toomer talks to members of the media outside the Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, March 21, 2017, about the dangers of eliminating Medicaid and Affordable Care Act protections.

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An iceberg twice the size of New York City will break off of antarctic, NASA says

SALT LAKE CITY — NASA says an iceberg about twice the size of New York City will break off of an ice shelf in Antarctica, USA Today reports.

Researchers noticed a giant crack in the middle of the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica.

How it’ll happen: Two cracks in the shelf will lead to massive break-off. The Halloween crack, which first appeared in October 2016, will move eastward.

The second crack, which breaks off northward, has been fine for 35 years according to CNN. But that second crack started accelerating at about 2.5 miles per year. Once the cracks meet, the iceberg will be born.

When the crack widens enough, it will create an iceberg measuring about 660 square miles, according to USA Today. New York City measures 302 square miles.

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“We don’t have a clear picture of what drives the shelf’s periods of advance and retreat through calving,” said Chris Shuman, a glaciologist with NASA and the University of Maryland Baltimore County, in a statement. “The likely future loss of the ice on the other side of the Halloween Crack suggests that more instability is possible.”

NASA did not confirm when it will happen. The agency said it is “poised” to happen, CNN reports.

The Brunt Ice Shelf currently leans out of the Weddell Sea just south of South America, according to CNN.

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A California couple’s only child died in a skiing accident. Should they be able to have a grandchild by preserving his sperm?

SALT LAKE CITY — He was their only child, a son, prized in their homeland of China as the person who would carry on the family name.

So when Peter Zhu broke his spine on a ski slope in February and was later declared brain-dead, California residents Yongmin and Monica Zhu suffered not only the loss of their 21-year-old son but also the end of their family’s lineage.

Now, the couple is hoping that a New York judge will mitigate the tragedy by granting them the right to have a grandchild using sperm collected when their son’s organs were removed for transplant. A hearing is scheduled March 21 in New York.

The unusual case is being watched by bioethicists and assisted reproduction experts around the country because if the judge grants the Zhus’ request, the decision could result in an increase in the number of people who ask that the sperm or eggs of their deceased loved ones be preserved.

It’s an easy procedure but ethically complex, especially when grandparents are making the request, not a bereaved partner or spouse.

The considerations include not just the rights of the living and the dead, but also the welfare of the child or children that could be conceived because of the decision. And while the American Society for Reproductive Medicine has issued ethical guidelines for posthumous conception, there are few laws that govern the practice, leaving judges, in effect, the power to authorize a new life.

“We are desperate to have a small piece of Peter that might live on and continue to spread the joy and happiness that Peter brought to all of our lives.”

The Zhu family

“In the context of a lot of trauma and a lot of drama, these decisions are being made. And the basic issue here … is that the law may not be congruent with ethics or moral decisions that go on in our field. The law oftentimes follows the science. I don’t know if that’s a good thing or a bad thing,” said Dr. Mark V. Sauer, chairman of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Rutgers University.

A key factor in whether a judge authorizes the collection and release of gametes — the cells of reproduction — is the existence of consent by the deceased, either explicit or implied.

The Zhus say their son repeatedly expressed a desire for a large family, and they argue in a court filing that using his sperm to conceive a child posthumously grants his wish, while perpetuating the family name and helping the couple cope with their grief.

“We are desperate to have a small piece of Peter that might live on and continue to spread the joy and happiness that Peter brought to all of our lives,” they said.

But bioethicists warn that doing the kind thing isn’t always doing the right thing and that difficult decisions like the one facing New York Justice John P. Colangelo, the judge in the Zhu case, could be averted by advance directives. That’s easier for a couple making plans for their future, but it’s not typically a conversation that a 21-year-old brimming with potential typically has with parents — which is why Colangelo is facing a decision that is literally the stuff of life or death.

Rush decisions

Peter Zhu, a cadet at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, was on track to graduate in May and attend medical school. But he was found unconscious at a ski slope Feb. 23 and determined to be brain-dead because of a fractured spine that cut off oxygen to his brain.

In this undated photo provided by the United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., USMA cadet Peter L. Zhu is shown. West Point officials say Zhu died Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019 of injuries he sustained while skiing on Feb. 23 at Victor Constant Ski Area on the academy grounds. (United States Military Academy via AP)

United States Military Academy via AP

In this undated photo provided by the United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., USMA cadet Peter L. Zhu is shown. West Point officials say Zhu died Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019 of injuries he sustained while skiing on Feb. 23 at Victor Constant Ski Area on the academy grounds. (United States Military Academy via AP)

On the day his organs were to be retrieved for transplantation, his parents filed an emergency request asking that his sperm also be collected, and Colangelo granted the request less than four hours before the transplant surgery was to begin. But the judge only ordered that the sperm be collected and stored, saving the decision about what to do with the cells for later.

There is a necessary urgency to the process because gametes must be collected at or near the time of death. Even so, the urgent timeline does not allow for the thoughtful consideration of the issues involved in posthumous conception, said Sauer, a longtime member of the Ethics Committee of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine.

These issues include who will bear the child, who will raise it and how the circumstances of birth will psychologically affect what some have called “memorial children.” And in some states, biological parents who are dead before the child is conceived can’t be listed as a parent on a birth certificate because of states’ laws on inheritances and the complications presented by Social Security benefits.

“The child will never replace the person you’ve lost.”

Dr. Louise King, an assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology at Harvard Medical School in Boston

“There are a lot of downstream issues here. And with all due respect to these parents, it’s awfully hard to know what you’re facing,” Sauer said.

In previous cases, most involving a bereaved spouse or partner, judges have imposed waiting periods so that their judgment is not clouded by grief.

“When a spouse has given explicit permission, we still ask them to wait, and we ask them to wait because after about a year’s time, they tend to withdraw the request,” said Dr. Louise King, an assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology at Harvard Medical School in Boston.

“And the reason for that is that you’re trying to replace someone, and of course, the child will never replace the person you’ve lost,” she said.

One example is the case of Daniel Christy, cited in a 2018 paper published in the Journal of Law and the Biosciences.

Christy was pronounced brain-dead after a motorcycle accident in 2007, and his fiance, with the support of his parents, asked to retrieve his sperm. Initially denied, the collection was ultimately authorized by a judge that likened sperm retrieval to that of organs.

“The court held that under the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act, the term ‘anatomical gift’ also includes sperm donation. It argued that such a donation could be granted by either the donor himself or, if he did not refuse to make such a donation, his parents,” wrote Shelly Simana, a doctoral candidate at Harvard University, in “Creating life after death: Should posthumous reproduction be legally permissible without the deceased’s prior consent?”

In the paper, Simana argues that posthumous reproduction should be permitted when it is in the interest of the living, including grandparents, and when the deceased did not explicitly say he or she was against it.

As King noted, however, sometimes time strips away the desire.

Christy’s fiancée obtained his sperm through a court order, but never used it, she told Andrew Joseph of STAT. She eventually married and had children with someone else and did not renew the contract with the sperm bank when it expired, meaning that the sperm was likely thawed, ending its life-giving potential.

The possibility of a secondary death — “it can appear to the parents that they’re killing part of their son” — is something else people don’t usually think about in the immediate pain of loss and the rush to obtain gametes, said Mark Wicclair, adjunct professor of medicine at the Center for Bioethics & Health Law at the University of Pittsburgh.

There have also been cases where sperm was saved and conception attempted, but a pregnancy did not result.

That’s why it’s often better just to not save the gametes at all, Wicclair said, unless there is a “very compelling reason.”

“Even with a waiting period, there can be significant pressures on a person not to change their mind, even if they have second thoughts.”

A need for policy

According to the Zhus, their cultural identity is one of the “compelling reasons” that Wicclair said could justify a request.

In their court filing, the Zhus wrote that their extended family had suffered from China’s longtime one-child policy, and their son had been family’s only chance to continue its lineage, since in China, the family name is only passed on through males.

“When Peter was born, his grandfather cried tears of joy that a son was born to carry on our family’s name,” they wrote. “Peter took this role very seriously and fully intended to carry on our family’s lineage through children of his own.”

While that argument may sway people in China, it is unlikely to fly in the American judicial system, said King, noting that Israel is the only country that liberally grants posthumous reproduction rights, in part because of the genocide perpetuated on the Jewish people and the perceived need to repopulate globally.

“I’ve never lost a child, but I know that it scars you for the rest of your life. Every child is irreplaceable.”

Paige Comstock Cunningham, executive director of the Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity at Trinity International University in Illinois

Wicclair also said that a person’s desire to have children in life doesn’t necessarily apply to having children after death.

“Would the cadet have approved of having a child after being deceased when he had absolutely no control over who the mother would be or how the child would be raised?” he asked.

The Zhus’ cultural argument is disturbing for another reason to Paige Comstock Cunningham, executive director of the Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity at Trinity International University in Illinois.

She said that if granted the right to Peter’s sperm, the Zhus would likely select only male embryos because of their cultural preference for boys.

“That’s discrimination even before the child comes into existence,” Cunningham said. “It’s very possible the female embryos will be destroyed, and I find that really troubling.”

While Cunningham said she deeply sympathizes with the Zhus on the loss of their son, she believes that difficult decisions can’t be made solely for reasons of compassion.

“One of our characteristics culturally is that we tend to make these ethical decisions based on how we feel about something. And we as Americans are very compassionate and we empathize with people who have experienced great loss.

“I’ve never lost a child, but I know that it scars you for the rest of your life. Every child is irreplaceable. But we tend to think that whatever it takes to alleviate pain and suffering is justifiable. I have problems making these decisions based on how badly this makes us feel and how tragic the circumstances are,” Cunningham said.

Both Wicclair, at the University of Pittsburgh, and Sauer, at Rutgers, say there’s a need for states to deal with this issue legislatively, rather than leaving judges, pressured by grieving families, to make quick decisions, sometimes without precedents.

Although posthumous gamete recovery was first done in the U.S. 30 years ago, there’s been little legislative guidance, Sauer said.

“It would be in the best interest of each state to have a statutory law that governs it,” he said. “For physicians like myself, it would be very helpful to have some guidance, one way or the other.”

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TV review: BYUtv’s ‘Dwight in Shining Armor’ is pretty funny and shows good potential to be really funny

SALT LAKE CITY — Picture a clean, kid-friendly version of “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” with bad graphics, and you’ll get an approximate idea of BYUtv’s newest original series “Dwight in Shining Armor.”

So far, BYUtv’s attempts at original scripted TV shows have been mixed — “Granite Flats” (2013-15) gained a dedicated following but still fell to cancellation, while the Orson Scott Card co-created “Extinct” (2017) lasted only one season. As the network’s third original show, time will tell if “Dwight in Shining Armor” will be the network’s game-changer. In the two episodes screened for the press, the premise, writing and acting show a lot of potential. Maybe with some more attention and money, the show will be able to reach it.

“Dwight in Shining Armor” takes a twist on the “Sleeping Beauty” story. After Princess Gretta’s court magician puts her under a spell to protect her from her enemies, she is awakened in modern America by an unsuspecting, clean-cut high schooler named Dwight. When he falls face first into the pit where Gretta is buried, Dwight accidentally kisses her, putting himself under magical contract to become her champion and defend her against her “hordes” of enemies who have awakened with her.

The goofy series does a good job of not taking itself seriously and, as production designer Kody Busch told the Deseret News for a previous article, in this show “the suspension of belief just goes out the window.” “Dwight” also doesn’t worry too often about following logic, and for that reason might work best for children, or adults who don’t care about giant plot holes (such as how a medieval princess came to be buried in America in the first place).

But there are a sizable number of genuinely funny lines scattered throughout the show, and situations so humorous you can (sometimes) forgive that they don’t always make sense. Sloane Siegel is goofy and lovable as the do-gooder Dwight, and Caitlin Carmichael is a tough, gritty Princess Gretta who has actual chemistry with Siegel, while Joel McCrary delivers his lines as the court magician Baldric with comedic grace. If you ignore the fact that all the medieval characters inexplicably have American accents (except for one that’s somehow Italian), the acting is pretty good.

Sloane Siegel as Dwight in BYUtv's "Dwight in Shining Armor."

Chad Kirkland

Sloane Siegel as Dwight in BYUtv's "Dwight in Shining Armor."

But perhaps the best part of “Dwight” is how it bends overdone tropes. Instead of giving the tough, armored Gretta a feminine makeover so Dwight can go googly-eyed at the sight of her in a dress, he simply tells her, “Your look is awesome. Don’t change a thing.” And rather than the champion rescuing the princess with sword in hand, Gretta is the superior fighter (just believe that she is, no matter what you actually see), while Dwight wins people over with his charm and wit.

Computer graphics and fight scene issues could both be solved with more money, and plot holes could be explained in future episodes. Even the second episode seems to improve on the pilot, giving Dwight and Gretta fuller back stories that will hopefully just get more fleshed out as the story continues. There’s a lot of potential behind “Dwight in Shining Armor” — here’s hoping the show can fulfill it.

“Dwight in Shining Armor” premieres on BYUtv Monday, March 18, at 7:30 p.m.

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Capsules from all 68 teams in the NCAA Tournament

WEST REGIONAL

Gonzaga

  • Spokane, Wash., 30-3.
  • Nickname: Bulldogs. Coach: Mark Few.
  • Conference: West Coast. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 1.
  • Tournament History: 31-21, 1 Final Four in 21 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Florida State in the Sweet Sixteen.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 88.8 points per game, 53.2 fg pct, 36.5 3-pt pct, 76.7 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Rui Hachimura 20.1; Brandon Clarke 16.5; Zach Norvell Jr. 15.3.
  • Rebounds: Clarke 8.4; Hachimura 6.6; Avg team margin (plus-6.2).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.76): Perkins (6.5/2.1), 215 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1
  • Best Win: 89-87 vs. Duke on Nov. 21.
  • Worst Loss: 47-60 vs. St. Mary’s on March 12.
  • The Skinny: Despite their face plant in the WCC tournament championship game, the Bulldogs proved their mettle by beating Duke in the championship game of the Maui Invitational in November. The top-scoring offense in the country had just 47 in a 13-point loss to Saint Mary’s, a team it had beaten by 48 and 14 during the regular season. Killian Tillie, the WCC tournament MVP in 2018, appears ready contribute after missing all but a handful of games this season because of foot injuries.

Fairleigh Dickinson

  • Teaneck, N.J., 20-13.
  • Nickname: Knights. Coach: Greg Herenda.
  • Conference: Northeast. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 16.
  • Tournament History: 0-5 in 5 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 1998, lost to UConn in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 75.4 points per game, 47.8 fg pct, 40.3 3-pt pct, 73.2 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Darnell Edge 16.4; Jahlil Jenkins 13.5; Mike Holloway Jr. 12.5.
  • Rebounds: Kaleb Bishop 6.3; Holloway Jr. 5.5; Avg team margin (minus-0.8).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.05): Jenkins (4.5/2.1), 149 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1.
  • Best Win: 77-66 at Princeton on Nov. 21.
  • Worst Loss: 96-103 at home to Central Connecticut State.
  • The Skinny:Fairleigh Dickinson captured its second Northeast Conference Championship in the last four years with an 85-76 victory over St. Francis (Pa.) in the title game. The Knights (20-13) shot 64 percent from the field, with all 85 points coming from their starters, and beat the top-seeded Red Flash (18-14) on the road for the second time this season. The Knights have won 14 of their last 16 games, including eight straight, and will be in the NCAA Tournament for the sixth time in program history.

Prairie View A&M

  • Prairie View, Texas, 22-12.
  • Nickname: Panthers. Coach: Byron Smith.
  • Conference: Southwestern Athletic. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 16.
  • Tournament History: 0-1, in 1 appearance.
  • Last appearance: 1998, lost to Kansas in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 75.0 points per game, 43.8 fg pct, 31.1 3-pt pct, 68.1 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Gary Blackston 15.2; Devonte Patterson 13.4; Gerard Andrus 10.0.
  • Rebounds: Blackston 7.0; Andrus 5.7; Avg team margin (minus-4.4).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (0.99): Dennis Jones (4.5/3.0), 140 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 10-0.
  • Best Win: 81-64 at Santa Clara on Nov. 9
  • Worst Loss: 64-76 at East Carolina on Nov. 21.
  • The Skinny: The Panthers have an 11-game winning streak and are dancing for the first time in 21 years, thanks to a 92-86 win over cross-town rival Texas Southern in the conference title game. It has been a historic season at Prairie View, which won the SWAC regular season and tournament championship for the first time. The Panthers won their season-opener at Santa Clara and then lost 11 straight road games before returning home.

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Syracuse

  1. Syracuse, N.Y., 20-13.
  2. Nickname: Orange. Coach: Jim Boeheim.
  3. Conference: Atlantic Coast. Bid: At large.
  4. Region: West. Seed: No. 8.
  5. Tournament History: 68-39, 6 Final Fours and 1 National Championship in 39 appearances.
  6. Last appearance: 2018, lost to Duke in the Sweet Sixteen.
  7. Season Stats:
  8. Scoring: 69.7 points per game, 42.2 fg pct, 32.7 3-pt pct, 68.4 ft pct.
  9. Top Scorers: Tyus Battle 17.2; Elijah Hughes 13.4; Oshae Brissett 12.4.
  10. Rebounds: Brissett 7.5; Paschal Chukwu 5.4; Avg team margin (minus-2.0).
  1. Assist/Turnover Ratio (0.99): Frank Howard (2.9/2.0), 84 assists.
  2. Last 10 Games: 4-6.
  3. Best Win: 95-91 at Duke on Jan. 14.
  4. Worst Loss: 59-73 at home to Georgia Tech on Jan. 12.
  5. The Skinny: The Orange tied for sixth place in the Atlantic Coast Conference regular season before losing to Duke 84-72 in the quarterfinals of the conference tournament. Syracuse had no answer for the return of Duke’s Zion Williamson, who scored 29 points on 13-of-13 shooting with 14 rebounds. The Orange played the two tourney games without leading scorer Tyus Battle (17.2 points per game). Battle is expected to be ready for the NCAA Tournament where the Orange are projected as a No. 10 seed.

Baylor

  • Waco, Texas, 19-13.
  • Nickname: Bears. Coach: Scott Drew.
  • Conference: Big 12. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 9.
  • Tournament History: 13-13, 2 Final Fours in 11 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2017, lost to South Carolina in the Sweet Sixteen.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 71.8 points per game, 44.0 fg pct, 33.9 3-pt pct, 67.3 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Tristan Clark 14.6; Makai Mason 14.6; Mario Kegler 10.7.
  • Rebounds: Mark Vital 7.2; Clark 6.3; Avg team margin (plus-6.4).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.05): Mason (3.3/2.6), 85 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 4-6.
  • Best Win: 73-62 at home to Texas Tech on Jan. 19.
  • Worst Loss: 58-59 at home to Stephen F. Austin on Dec. 18.
  • The Skinny: The Bears are limping as they enter the tournament with four-straight defeats. They’ve dropped four of their last 11 following a six-game win streak. Baylor is following a similar script from the 2017-18 season when it lost four of its last five, missed out on the NCAA Tournament and split a pair of games in the National Invitation Tournament. Baylor has dropped five of eight contests against Top 25 opponents this season. The Bears last made the Sweet 16 two years ago which resulted in 70-50 loss against South Carolina.

___

Marquette

  • Milwaukee, Wis., 24-9.
  • Nickname: Golden Eagles. Coach: Steve Wojciechowski.
  • Conference: Big East. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 5.
  • Tournament History: 41-33, 3 Final Fours and 1 National Championship in 32 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2017, lost to South Carolina in the first round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 77.7 points per game, 45.9 fg pct, 39.3 3-pt pct, 75.9 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Markus Howard 25.0; Sam Hauser 14.9; Joey Hauser 9.7.
  • Rebounds: S. Hauser 7.1; J. Hauser 5.3; Avg team margin (plus-4.5).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (0.98): Howard (4.0/4.0), 131 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 5-5.
  • Best Win: 109-85 at home to Buffalo on Dec. 21.
  • Worst Loss: 73-96 at Indiana on Nov. 14.
  • The Skinny: The No. 23 Golden Eagles finished second during the Big East Conference regular season before being upset by Seton Hall 81-79 in the semifinals when conference player of the year Markus Howard missed from point-blank range at the buzzer. There were 57 fouls, including nine technical, 85 free throws and three ejections in the game. Marquette went 1-5 to close out the regular season and tourney.

Murray State

  • Murray, Ky., 27-4.
  • Nickname: Racers. Coach: Matt McMahon.
  • Conference: Ohio Valley. Bid: Automatic
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 12.
  • Tournament History: 3-16 in 16 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to West Virginia the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 83.3 points per game, 49.6 fg pct, 34.8 3-pt pct, 73.9 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Ja Morant 24.6; Shaq Buchanan 13.0; Tevin Brown 11.7.
  • Rebounds: Darnell Cowart 6.5; Morant 5.5; Avg team margin (plus-3.8).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.50): Morant (10.0/5.2), 311 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 10-0.
  • Best Win: 77-65 vs. Belmont on March 9.
  • Worst Loss: 68-88 at Jacksonville State on Jan. 31.
  • The Skinny: Ja Morant fans got their wish when the high-scoring guard and OVC player of the year led the Racers’ to the conference tournament title and their second consecutive NCAA berth. The sophomore guard, who could become a top-five draft pick, has shot over 50 percent this season while averaging 24.6 points, 10 assists and 5.5 rebounds per game. Any first-round opponent can’t be thrilled with drawing this mid major with its big-league offensive threat.

___

Florida State

  • Tallahassee, 27-7.
  • Nickname: Seminoles. Coach: Leonard Hamilton.
  • Conference: Atlantic Coast. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 4.
  • Tournament History: 19-16, 1 Final Four in 16 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Michigan in the Elite Eight.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 74.9 points per game, 44.3 fg pct, 33.6 3-pt pct, 74.1 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Mfiondu Kabengele 12.9; Terance Mann 11.2; Trent Forrest 9.1.
  • Rebounds: Mann 6.4; Kabengele 5.7; Avg team margin (plus-4.7).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (0.95): Forrest (3.8/2.0), 128 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 69-59 vs. Virginia on March 15.
  • Worst Loss: 62-75 at Pittsburgh on Jan. 14.
  • The Skinny: The Noles are more than capable of duplicating last year’s run to the Elite Eight, which included a 75-60 win over Gonzaga in the Sweet 16. Three of their seven defeats occurred Jan. 12 – 20, one of which was an 80-78 defeat against then top-ranked Duke. Since that three-game skid, Florida State is 14-2 without consecutive defeats. Florida State sports wins over regular-season champs LSU, Purdue and Virginia.

Vermont

  • Burlington, 27-6.
  • Nickname: Catamounts. Coach: John Becker.
  • Conference: America East. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 13.
  • Tournament History: 2-6 in 6 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2017, lost to Purdue in the first round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 74.2 points per game, 46.0 fg pct, 35.4 3-pt pct, 75.2 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Anthony Lamb 21.1; Ernie Duncan 14.0; Stef Smith 12.1.
  • Rebounds: Lamb 7.8; Smith 4.0; Avg team margin (plus-4.3).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.09): Robin Duncan (2.6/1.4), 82 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1.
  • Best Win: 75-70 at home to Northeastern on Dec. 16.
  • Worst Loss: 61-74 at home to Maryland-Baltimore County on Jan. 23.
  • The Skinny: Anthony Lamb, the America East Conference player of the year (21.4 ppg, 7.8 rebounds) had a monster tournament final, pouring in 28 points and grabbing nine boards as Vermont defeated defending tournament champion UMBC 66-49. Vermont had lost all three contests against the Retrievers since a 65-62 upset on a buzzer-beater 3-pointer in the 2018 final. The Catamounts are 105-9 when holding an opponent to 60 points or less since coach John Becker took over in the 2011-12 season.

___

Buffalo

  • Buffalo, N.Y., 31-3.
  • Nickname: Bulls. Coach: Nate Oats.
  • Conference: Mid-American. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 6.
  • Tournament History: 1-3 in 3 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Kentucky in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 84.9 points per game, 46.3 fg pct, 33.6 3-pt pct, 69.1 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: CJ Massinburg 18.3; Nick Perkins 14.4; Jeremy Harris 14.0.
  • Rebounds: Perkins 7.3; Massinburg 6.6; Avg team margin (plus-4.0).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.43): Davonta Jordan (3.6/2.3), 121 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 10-0.
  • Best Win: 71-59 at Syracuse on Dec. 18.
  • Worst Loss: 75-77 at Northern Illinois on Jan. 22.
  • The Skinny: Buffalo has established itself as a formidable opponent heading into the tournament. In winning the Mid-American Conference Championship for the second consecutive year, and fourth in the last five seasons, the Bulls’ 31 wins are the most ever by a team out of the MAC. The Bulls have won 12 straight and haven’t lost since Feb. 1. The Bulls were a 13-seed entering the NCAA tournament last year and spanked No. 4-seed Arizona 89-68 in the first round.

Arizona State

  • Tempe, 22-10.
  • Nickname: Sun Devils. Coach: Bobby Hurley.
  • Conference: Pacific 12. Bid: At Large
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 11.
  • Tournament History: 13-16 in 15 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Syracuse in the First Four.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 77.8 points per game, 44.7 fg pct, 34.1 3-pt pct, 67.1 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Luguentz Dort 16.1; Remy Martin 13.4; Zylan Cheatham 11.8.
  • Rebounds: Cheatham 10.4; Romello White 5.3; Avg team margin (plus-4.8).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.00): Martin (5.1/1.9), 154 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 80-76 at home to Kansas on Dec. 22.
  • Worst Loss: 70-91 at home to Washington State on Feb. 7.
  • The Skinny: The Sun Devils finished second in the Pac-12 Conference during the regular season before bowing in overtime to Oregon 79-75 in the semifinal round of the conference tournament. Pac-12 freshman of the year Luguentz Dort topped ASU with 16 points against the Ducks. One thing in Arizona State’s favor for an at-large berth is an 11-5 record against teams in Quads 1 and 2, the best showing of any team being projected as a 10 through 12 seed.

St. John’s

  • Jamaica, N.Y., 21-12.
  • Nickname: Red Storm. Coach: Chris Mullin.
  • Conference: Big East. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 11.
  • Tournament History: 27-31, 2 Final Fours in 29 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2015, lost to San Diego State in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 78.3 points per game, 45.8 fg pct, 36.7 3-pt pct, 72.8 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Shamorie Ponds 19.5; Mustapha Heron 14.9; LJ Figueroa 14.3.
  • Rebounds: Figueroa 6.2; Marvin Clark II 5.4; Avg team margin (minus-5.8).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.36): Ponds (5.2/2.0), 165 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 4-6.
  • Best Win: 71-65 at home to Villanova on Feb. 17.
  • Worst Loss: 71-79 at home to DePaul on Jan. 12.
  • The Skinny: St. John’s received its first NCAA Tournament berth in Chris Mullin’s four years as coach. St. John’s was considered on the bubbled after another early exit in the Big East tournament as it hasn’t been to the semifinals since 2000. The Red Storm, after topping a ranked Marquette team twice in the regular season, shot a season-low 32.8 percent against the Golden Eagles in the quarterfinals.

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Texas Tech

  • Lubbock, 26-6.
  • Nickname: Red Raiders. Coach: Chris Beard.
  • Conference: Big 12. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 3.
  • Tournament History: 8-16 in 15 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2016, lost to Butler in first round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 73.1 points per game, 47.2 fg pct, 36.8 3-pt pct, 72.8 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Jarrett Culver 18.5; Davide Moretti 11.6; Matt Mooney 10.9.
  • Rebounds: Culver 6.3; Tariq Owens 5.7; Avg team margin (plus-2.2).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.13): Culver (3.7/2.7), 117 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1.
  • Best Win: 91-62 at Kansas on Jan. 2.
  • Worst Loss: 74-79 vs. West Virginia on March 14.
  • The Skinny: Seventh-ranked Texas Tech was upset by 10th-seeded West Virginia in the quarterfinals of the Big 12 Tournament, snapping a nine-game winning streak. It was the Red Raiders’ first defeat since a loss at Kansas on February 2, and Texas Tech is now 14-23 all-time 23 Big 12 Conference tournament appearances. The Red Raiders, co-regular season champs, will be making their 17th appearance in the NCAA Tournament.

Northern Kentucky

  • Highland Heights, 26-8.
  • Nickname: Norse. Coach: John Brannen.
  • Conference: Horizon. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 14.
  • Tournament History: 0-1, in 1 appearance.
  • Last appearance: 2017, lost to Kentucky in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 79.1 points per game, 48.1 fg pct, 36.6 3-pt pct, 66.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Drew McDonald 19.1; Tyler Sharpe 14.1; Jalen Tate 14.0.
  • Rebounds: McDonald 9.5; Dantez Walton 5.5; Avg team margin (plus-4.4).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.37): Tate (4.1/2.3), 122 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 77-66 vs. Wright State on March 12.
  • Worst Loss: 77-83 at home to Cleveland State on Feb. 23.
  • The Skinny: The Norse are headed to the NCAA Tournament for a second time in three seasons after beating top-seeded Wright State 77-66 in the championship game of the Horizon League Tournament. Dantez Walton notched his first double-double with 15 points and 14 rebounds to lead No. 2 seed NKU to the victory. Northern Kentucky had a solid showing as a No. 15 seed two years ago, falling to second-seeded Kentucky 79-70.

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Nevada

  • Reno, 29-4.
  • Nickname: Wolf Pack. Coach: Eric Musselman.
  • Conference: Mountain West. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 7.
  • Tournament History: 6-8 in 8 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Loyola-Chicago in the Sweet Sixteen.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 80.7 points per game, 46.6 fg pct, 35.1 3-pt pct, 70.8 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Caleb Martin 19.2; Jordan Caroline 17.3; Cody Martin 11.7.
  • Rebounds: Caroline 9.6; Tre’Shawn Thurman 5.7; Avg team margin (plus-2.4).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.46): Cody Martin (5.1/1.9), 167 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 72-49 at home to Utah State on Jan. 2.
  • Worst Loss: 58-85 at New Mexico on Jan. 5.
  • The Skinny: The Wolf Pack made the Sweet 16 last year and had a shot at advancing before losing a lead against the team that captured everyone’s hearts, Loyola Chicago. Nevada improved its defense this year and added Portland transfer Jazz Johnson. Of concern is the Achilles injury that caused Jordan Carolina (17.3 ppg, 9.6 rpg) to miss the Mountain West tournament semifinal loss to San Diego State. The 58 wins over the past two seasons is the best in Nevada history.

Florida

  • Gainesville, 19-15.
  • Nickname: Gators. Coach: Mike White.
  • Conference: Southeastern. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 10.
  • Tournament History: 46-19, 5 Final Fours and 2 National Championships in 21 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Texas Tech in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 68.3 points per game, 42.7 fg pct, 33.5 3-pt pct, 71.8 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: KeVaughn Allen 12.0; Noah Locke 9.6; Jalen Hudson 9.0.
  • Rebounds: Kevarrius Hayes 6.3; Keyontae Johnson 6.2; Avg team margin (minus-0.6).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.04): Andrew Nembhard (5.1/2.1), 154 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 6-4.
  • Best Win: 82-77 at LSU on Feb. 20.
  • Worst Loss: 55-61 at home to Georgia on March 2.
  • The Skinny: Once conference play started, the Gators have experienced two, three-game losing streaks and a five-game win stretch against then No. 13 LSU. The Gators are just 2-9 against Top 25 opponents this season. Both those wins came against LSU. The Gators last best run in the NCAA Tournament occurred two years ago when they advanced to the Elite Eight and lost to South Carolina, 77-70.

___

Michigan

  • Ann Arbor, 28-6.
  • Nickname: Wolverines. Coach: John Beilein.
  • Conference: Big Ten. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 2.
  • Tournament History: 59-27, 8 Final Fours and 1 National Championship in 28 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Villanova in the National Championship.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 70.7 points per game, 45.1 fg pct, 35.1 3-pt pct, 69.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Ignas Brazdeikas 14.9; Jordan Poole 12.8; Charles Matthews 12.3.
  • Rebounds: Jon Teske 6.8; Brazdeikas 5.2; Avg team margin (plus-0.5).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.56): Zavier Simpson (6.5/1.9), 214 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 6-4.
  • Best Win: 84-67 at home to North Carolina on Nov. 28.
  • Worst Loss: 69-75 at Penn State on Feb. 12.
  • The Skinny: Minus their three defeats against Michigan State since Feb. 24., the Wolverines enter thetournament having won 11 out of their last 13 games. Last year’s NCAA runner-up will begin this year’s tournament a seed higher and facing the same opening-round opponent when it takes on Montana. If the top seeds hold serve, Michigan could square off against No. 1-seed Gonzaga in an Elite Eight matchup in the West Region. The good news for the Wolverines is the Spartans are in the East.

Montana

  • Missoula, 26-8.
  • Nickname: Grizzlies. Coach: Travis DeCuire.
  • Conference: Big Sky. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: West. Seed: No. 15.
  • Tournament History: 2-1 in 10 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Michigan in the first round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 76.8 points per game, 49.7 fg pct, 38.0 3-pt pct, 68.9 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Jamar Akoh 15.5; Sayeed Pridgett 15.1; Ahmaad Rorie 15.0.
  • Rebounds: Akoh 8.7; Oguine 5.4; Avg team margin (plus-2.6).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.23): Rorie (4.0/1.6), 137 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 81-74 at home to Georgia State on Nov. 9.
  • Worst Loss: 74-77 at home to Portland State on Jan. 5.
  • The Skinny: For the second straight year the Grizzlies rallied from a double-figure deficit to defeat Eastern Washington in the conference championship game to make it to the NCAA Tournament a dozen times. Seniors Ahmaad Rorie and Donaven Dorsey played AAU basketball together during middle school in California but went to rival high schools. Both started their college careers as rivals, Rorie at Washington and Dorsey at Oregon. Coach DeCuire, who was in the hunt for the California job, could be a hot commodity after back-to-back NCAAs. Montana’s first NCAA was in 1975, when the Grizzlies beat Utah State before dropping a 67-64 thriller to UCLA when John Wooden was guiding the Bruins to his last championship. Montana also beat No. 5 seed Nevada in 2006.

EAST REGIONAL

Duke's Zion Williamson celebrates Duke's win over Florida State after cutting a piece of a net after the NCAA college basketball championship game of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament in Charlotte, N.C., Saturday, March 16, 2019. (AP Photo/Nell Redmond)

Nell Redmond

Duke's Zion Williamson celebrates Duke's win over Florida State after cutting a piece of a net after the NCAA college basketball championship game of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament in Charlotte, N.C., Saturday, March 16, 2019. (AP Photo/Nell Redmond)

Duke

  • Durham, N.C., 29-5.
  • Nickname: Blue Devils. Coach: Mike Krzyzewski.
  • Conference: Atlantic Coast. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 1.
  • Tournament History: 111-37, 16 Final Fours and 5 National Titles in 49 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Kansas in the Elite Eight.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 83.5 points per game, 47.7 fg pct, 30.2 3-pt pct, 69.0 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: RJ Barrett 22.9; Zion Williamson 22.1; Cam Reddish 13.7.
  • Rebounds: Williamson 8.9; Barrett 7.5; Avg team margin (plus-6.1).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.21): Tre Jones (5.3/1.5), 171 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 81-71 at Virginia on Feb. 9.
  • Worst Loss: 91-95 at home to Syracuse on Jan. 14.
  • The Skinny: Location is everything. The Blue Devils are now 83-31 when playing in current NBA venues, including 5-0 this season. Duke has won 14 of its last 16 in NBA arenas. In its ACC championship game win against Florida State, the Blue Devils extended their streak of at least one made 3-pointer in a game to 1,055; the nation’s third-longest active streak.

North Carolina Central

  • Durham, 18-15.
  • Nickname: Eagles. Coach: LeVelle Moton.
  • Conference: Mid Eastern Athletic. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 16.
  • Tournament History: 0-2 in 2 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2014, lost to Iowa State in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 71.4 points per game, 45.6 fg pct, 31.5 3-pt pct, 71.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Raasean Davis 14.6; Randy Miller Jr. 13.2; Jibri Blount 10.5.
  • Rebounds: Davis 8.9; Zacarry Douglas 7.8; Avg team margin (plus-6.5).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.00): Jordan Perkins (4.1/2.2), 115 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 50-47 vs. Norfolk State on March 16.
  • Worst Loss: 61-77 at McNeese State on Dec. 13.
  • The Skinny: NCCU, which was the No. 3 seed in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Tournament, knocked off second-seeded North Carolina A&T in the semifinals and No. 1 seed Norfolk State in the championship game to earn its third consecutive NCAA Tournament bid. The Eagles, who earned full membership in the conference in 2011 after transitioning from Division II, are the first program to win three straight MEAC Tournament titles since NC A&T won seven in a row from 1982-88. They led the conference in assists per game (15.7, No. 32 nationally) and rebound margin (plus-6.6, 15th) this season. NCCU’s only nonconference win over a D-I program this season came against Southern which finished the season 7-24.

North Dakota State

  • Fargo, 18-15.
  • Nickname: Bison. Coach: David Richman.
  • Conference: Summit League. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 16.
  • Tournament History: 1-3, in 3 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2015, lost to Gonzaga in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 73.2 points per game, 45.6 fg pct, 36.6 3-pt pct, 77.4 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Vinnie Shahid 12.8; Tyson Ward 12.3; Deng Geu 9.9.
  • Rebounds: Ward 6.3; Geu 5.0; Avg team margin (minus-1.4).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.09): Shahid (2.7/1.3), 88 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 73-63 vs. Nebraska-Omaha on March 12.
  • Worst Loss: 78-80 vs. Incarnate Word on Nov. 17.
  • The Skinny: North Dakota State had lost three in a row before a 69-66 win over Purdue Fort Wayne in the regular-season finale that started the Bison’s current four-game win streak capped by a 10-point victory over Omaha in the championship game of the Summit League tournament.

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VCU

  • Richmond, Va., 25-7.
  • Nickname: Rams. Coach: Mike Rhoades.
  • Conference: Atlantic 10. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 8.
  • Tournament History: 13-16, 1 Final Four in 16 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2015, lost to Ohio State in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 71.4 points per game, 44.2 fg pct, 30.7 3-pt pct, 69.8 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Marcus Evans 13.8; De’Riante Jenkins 11.4; Issac Vann 10.9.
  • Rebounds: Marcus Santos-Silva 7.4; Jenkins 3.9; Avg team margin (plus-1.3).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (0.99): Evans (3.2/2.6), 103 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1.
  • Best Win: 57-51 vs. Temple on Nov. 19.
  • Worst Loss: 70-75 vs. Rhode Island on March 15.
  • The Skinny: The Rams return to the NCAA Tournament for the eighth time in the nine years. VCU won just 18 games last season, its fewest since going 18-10 in 2002-03, and missed the postseason for the first time in more than a decade. Coach Mike Rhoades, now in his second year at the helm, led the Rams to a program-record tying 16 win in A-10 play and just their second regular-season title since 2008-09. The led the conference in scoring defense (61.6 points per game, No. 10), scoring margin (plus-9.8), field-goal percentage defense (.384, No. 6 nationally), 3-point field-goal percentage (.276, No. 3) and steals per game (8.0).

UCF

  • Orlando, 23-8.
  • Nickname: Knights. Coach: Johnny Dawkins.
  • Conference: American Athletic. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 9.
  • Tournament History: 0-4, in 4 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2005, lost to UConn in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 72.1 points per game, 46.3 fg pct, 35.4 3-pt pct, 64.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: BJ Taylor 16.0; Aubrey Dawkins 15.2; Tacko Fall 10.9.
  • Rebounds: Fall 7.3; Chad Brown 5.2; Avg team margin (plus-2.2).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.11): Terrell Allen (4.3/1.6), 132 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 69-64 at Houston on March 2.
  • Worst Loss: 79-80 at home to Florida Atlantic on Nov. 11.
  • The Skinny: The Knights, who won a school-record 23 games heading into the American Athletic Conference Tournament as the No. 4 seed, were upset by fifth-seeded Memphis in the quarterfinals. Tacko Fall had 12 points and 10 rebounds against Memphis for his sixth double-double. Central Florida is seeking its first trip to the NCAA Tournament since 2005 and its first as an at-large team.

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Mississippi State

  • Starkville, 23-10.
  • Nickname: Bulldogs. Coach: Ben Howland.
  • Conference: Southeastern. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 5.
  • Tournament History: 11-10, 1 Final Four in 10 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2009, lost to Washington in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 77.3 points per game, 47.2 fg pct, 37.8 3-pt pct, 71.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Quinndary Weatherspoon 18.2; Lamar Peters 11.7; Tyson Carter 10.5.
  • Rebounds: Reggie Perry 7.1; Aric Holman 6.2; Avg team margin (plus-3.8).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.07): Peters (5.2/3.0), 171 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 70-59 at home to Cincinnati on Dec. 15.
  • Worst Loss: 82-87 at South Carolina on Jan. 8.
  • The Skinny: The Bulldogs, who finished tied for fifth in the Southeastern Conference, fell to No. 8 Tennessee 83-76 in the conference tourney quarterfinals. Quinndary Weatherspoon, who leads the Bulldogs in scoring at 18.2 per game, had 17 points as MSU lost to the Volunteers for a second time this season. Mississippi State is hoping for its first trip the NCAA Tournament since the 2008-09 season.

Liberty

  • Lynchburg, Va., 28-6.
  • Nickname: Flames. Coach: Ritchie McKay.
  • Conference: Atlantic Sun. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 12.
  • Tournament History: 0-3 in 3 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2004, lost to St. Joseph’s in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 74.0 points per game, 49.0 fg pct, 36.7 3-pt pct, 77.1 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Scottie James 13.1; Caleb Homesley 12.0; Lovell Cabbil Jr. 11.5.
  • Rebounds: James 8.8; Homesley 5.5; Avg team margin (plus-2.2).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.35): Homesley (2.8/1.4), 94 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1
  • Best Win: 75-52 at home to Georgia State on Dec. 1.
  • Worst Loss: 70-79 at Vanderbilt on Nov. 19.
  • The Skinny: The Flames are back in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2013 after beating Lipscomb on the latter’s home court in the Atlantic Sun title game. All-conference picks Caleb Homesley and Scottie James anchor a team that have five players in the school’s top 50 all-time scorers. Liberty will bring its own version of the pack line defense into the tournament which has them fifth in the nation in scoring defense at 60.5 points per game.

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Virginia Tech

  • Blacksburg, 24-8.
  • Nickname: Hokies. Coach: Buzz Williams.
  • Conference: Atlantic Coast. Bid: At large.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 4.
  • Tournament History: 6-10 in 10 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Alabama in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 74.0 points per game, 47.5 fg pct, 39.4 3-pt pct, 75.8 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Nickeil Alexander-Walker 16.6; Kerry Blackshear Jr. 14.7; Justin Robinson 13.7.
  • Rebounds: Blackshear 7.4; Ty Outlaw 5.2; Avg team margin (plus-2.7).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.35): Robinson (5.2/2.7), 109 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 6-4.
  • Best Win: 77-72 at home to Duke on Feb. 26.
  • Worst Loss: 62-63 at Penn State on Nov. 27.
  • The Skinny: The Hokies have been grinding through games without injured point guard Justin Robinson (foot) since late January. The Hokies fought their way to six wins in their final 10 regular-season games. They beat Miami in the second round of the ACC Tournament before Terance Mann hit a wild off-balance runner with 1.8 seconds left in overtime to help Florida State advance to the semifinals. Virginia Tech coach Buzz Williams said Thursday Robinson is “making progress.” Williams said team medical staff will take new pictures of foot injury on Sunday.

Saint Louis

  • St. Louis, 23-12.
  • Nickname: Billikens. Coach: Randy Bennett.
  • Conference: West Coast. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 13.
  • Tournament History: 6-10 in 9 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2013, lost to Oregon in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 67.4 points per game, 41.9 fg pct, 31.3 3-pt pct, 60.0 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Javon Bess 15.4; Tramaine Isabell; Jordan Goodwin 10.4.
  • Rebounds:Hasahn French 8.4; Goodwin 7.3; Avg team margin (plus-6.8).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.00): Isabell (3.7/2.9), 121 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 66-64 at Seton Hall on Nov. 17.
  • Worst Loss: 81-84 at home to Richmond on Jan. 30.
  • The Skinny: Saint Louis rallied from 15-point, first-half deficit to get the Atlantic 10 championship and an NCAA Tournament bid. The sixth-seeded Billikens won four games in four days to earn their first A-10 title since 2013 and get back in the NCAAs for the first time since 2014. Tramaine Isabell was named the tournament’s most outstanding player. Third-year coach Travis Ford, in his first NCAA appearance with the school and seventh overall, took Oklahoma State to the NCAAs five times in eight seasons before being fired in 2016.

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Maryland

  • College Park, 22-10.
  • Nickname: Terrapins. Coach: Mark Turgeon.
  • Conference: Big Ten. Bid: At Large.
  • Region:East. Seed: 6.
  • Tournament History: 41-26, 2 Final Fours and 1 National Championship in 27 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2016, lost to Kansas in the Sweet Sixteen.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 71.4 points per game, 45.7 fg pct, 35.5 3-pt pct, 74.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Anthony Cowan Jr 16.0; Bruno Fernando 13.7; Jalen Smith 11.4..
  • Rebounds: Fernando 10.4; Smith 6.6; Avg team margin (plus-8.8).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.00): Cowan Jr. (4.3/2.9), 138 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 5-5.
  • Best Win: 70-56 at home to Purdue on Feb. 12.
  • Worst Loss: 67-78 vs. Illinois on Jan. 26.
  • The Skinny: Losing to Nebraska in the Big Ten quarterfinals is an unsightly way to end the regular season, as was a late-season 17-point loss to Penn State, which means the Terrapins have lost 3 of 4 and 4 of 7. Two of the Gophers’ wins were over Nebraska and Indiana when they were ranked, before they were exposed as not NCAA worthy.

Belmont

  • Nashville, Tenn., 26-5.
  • Nickname: Bruins. Coach: Brian Wardle.
  • Conference: Missouri Valley. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 11.
  • Tournament History: 0-7 in 7 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2015, lost to Virginia in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 87.4 points per game, 49.9 fg pct, 37.3 3-pt pct, 73.8 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Dylan Windler 21.4; Kevin McClain 16.3; Nick Muszynski 14.9.
  • Rebounds: Windler 10.7; Muszynski 5.9; Avg team margin (plus-3.8).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.71): Grayson Murphy (6.6/2.5), 104 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1.
  • Best Win: 79-66 at Murray State on Jan. 24.
  • Worst Loss: 92-100 at Green Bay on Dec. 1.
  • The Skinny: Belmont was undone in the Ohio Valley Conference championship game when Murray State star Ja Morant scored 22 of his 36 points in the second half for a 12-point win. It was the first automatic bid in this year’s NCAA Tournament. Belmont played without 6-foot-11 center Nick Muszynski, who suffered an ankle injury in a semifinal win over Austin Peay. The OVC freshman of the year averages 14.9 points and led the league in field-goal percentage (60.8) and blocks per game (2.2).

Temple

  • Philadelphia, 23-9.
  • Nickname: Owls. Coach: Fran Dunphy.
  • Conference: American Athletic. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 11.
  • Tournament History: 33-32, 2 Final Fours in 32 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2016, lost to Iowa in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 74.1 points per game, 43.9 fg pct, 33.1 3-pt pct, 71.9 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Shizz Alston Jr. 19.7; Quinton Rose 16.5; Nate Pierre-Louis 13.3.
  • Rebounds: Ernest Aflakpui 7.0; Pierre-Louis 5.7; Avg team margin (minus-2.9).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.30): Alston Jr. (5.0/2.6), 161 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 73-69 at home to Houston on Jan. 9.
  • Worst Loss: 58-76 at Tulsa on Feb. 9.
  • The Skinny: Temple’s NCAA Tournament hopes of making the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2016 — and the last time in coach Fran Dunphy’s final year — took a hit after a loss to Wichita in the American Athletic Conference quarterfinals. Quinton Rose and Shizz Alston give the Owls (23-9) two good wings. Alston averages 19.7 points per game, Rose 16.5 and Nate Pierre-Louis 13.5. The Owls average 44-percent shooting as a team, making an average of 7.5 3-pointers per game. Alston leads the team with an average of 5 assists per game and Rose leads with an average of 2.1 steals per game.

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LSU

  • Baton Rouge, 26-6.
  • Nickname: Tigers. Coach: Will Wade.
  • Conference: Southeastern. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 3.
  • Tournament History: 24-24, 4 Final Fours in 21 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2009, lost to North Carolina in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 81.4 points per game, 46.2 fg pct, 32.3 3-pt pct, 75.4 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Tremont Waters 15.1; Naz Reid 13.7; Skylar Mays 13.4.
  • Rebounds: Reid 7.2; Kavell Bigby-Williams 6.6; Avg team margin (plus-5.1).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (0.99): Waters (5.9/3.6), 178 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 73-71 at Kentucky on Feb. 12.
  • Worst Loss: 77-90 vs. Oklahoma State on Nov. 25.
  • The Skinny: The ninth-ranked and regular-season Southeastern Conference champion Tigers (26-6) were bounced in the SEC quarterfinals by Florida, 76-73, but more shockingly have lost coach Will Wade to suspension after he was overheard on a 2017 FBI wiretap discussing a possible NCAA recruiting violation. The “Smart thing” as Wade called on the wiretap briefly led to the suspension of freshman guard Javonte Smart. Smart was reinstated ahead of the SEC quarterfinal after meeting with NCAA investigators. The early exit from the SEC tournament has cost LSU a potential No. 1 seed, but interim coach Tony Benford holds out hope for a 2 seed give the Tigers’ 16-2 conference record with wins over Kentucky and Tennessee, which were both ranked No. 5 in the AP Top 25 at the time.

Yale

  • New Haven, Conn., 22-7.
  • Nickname: Bulldogs. Coach: James Jones.
  • Conference: Ivy League. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 14.
  • Tournament History: 1-5 in 4 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2016, lost to Duke in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 80.6 points per game, 49.4 fg pct, 37.0 3-pt pct, 72.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Miye Oni 17.6; Alex Copeland 13.4; Blake Reynolds 11.3.
  • Rebounds: Jordan Bruner 8.4; Oni 6.4; Avg team margin (plus-4.8).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.29): Oni (3.6/2.6), 98 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 78-65 at home to Penn on Feb. 9.
  • Worst Loss: 75-83 at home to Columbia on March 2.
  • The Skinny: Avenging two regular-season losses to archrival Harvard in the league tournament, the Bulldogs now hope to match the 2016 team that won a tournament game. Yale beat Baylor 79-75 before losing to Duke 71-64. Alex Copeland was the Ivy League tourney MVP after scoring 25 points against Harvard. The Bulldogs shot 60.4 percent in the title game and score at least 90 points for the eighth time this season. Prior to 2016, Yale’s previous NCAAs were in 1949, 1957 and 1962.

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Louisville

  • Louisville, Ky., 20-13.
  • Nickname: Cardinals. Coach: Chris Mack.
  • Conference: Atlantic Coast. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 7.
  • Tournament History: 76-43, 10 Final Fours and 3 National Championships in 42 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2017, lost to Michigan in the second round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 74.5 points per game, 43.4 fg pct, 34.2 3-pt pct, 77.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Jordan Nwora 17.2; Dwayne Sutton 10.2; Christen Cunningham 9.8.
  • Rebounds: Nwora 7.5; Sutton 6.9; Avg team margin (plus-3.7).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.08): Cunningham (4.9/2.0), 156 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 3-7.
  • Best Win: 83-62 at North Carolina on Jan. 12.
  • Worst Loss: 86-89 at Pittsburgh on Jan. 9.
  • The Skinny: Louisville beat North Carolina by 19 on Jan. 12 in Chapel Hill — Roy Williams’ worst home loss ever as Tar Heels coach — using their size and length to disrupt shooters and control the glass, but the Cardinals lost 83-70 in a rematch in the conference tournament quarterfinals.

Minnesota

  • Minneapolis, 21-13.
  • Nickname: Gophers. Coach: Richard Pitino.
  • Conference: Big Ten. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 10.
  • Tournament History: 13-13, 1 Final Four in 13 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2017 lost to Middle Tennessee State in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 70.8 points per game, 43.7 fg pct, 32.1 3-pt pct, 67.9 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Amir Coffey 16.3; Jordan Murphy 14.8; Daniel Oturu 10.8.
  • Rebounds: Murphy 11.5; Oturu 7.2; Avg team margin (plus-2.6).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.24): Coffey (3.2/2.4), 109 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 5-5.
  • Best Win: 75-73 vs. Purdue on March 16.
  • Worst Loss: 68-95 at Illinois on Jan. 16.
  • The Skinny: The Gophers were in precarious position before winning twice in the Big Ten tournament, getting to the 20-win plateau before getting blown out by Michigan in the semifinals 76-49. The quarterfinal win was No. 13 Purdue. They also beat ranked teams Wisconsin and Iowa but eight losses to ranked teams, which probably don’t mean as much as losses to Illinois, Nebraska and Boston College.

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Michigan State

  • East Lansing, 28-6.
  • Nickname: Spartans. Coach: Tom Izzo.
  • Conference: Big Ten. Bid: Automatic
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 2
  • Tournament History: 65-31, 9 Final Fours and 2 National Championships in 31 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Syracuse in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 79.2 points per game, 48.8 fg pct, 38.3 3-pt pct, 75.0 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Cassius Winston 19.0; Joshua Langford 15.0; Nick Ward 14.4.
  • Rebounds: Kenny Goins 9.0; Xavier Tillman 7.0; Avg team margin (plus-9.0).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.47): Winston (7.5/2.9), 247 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1.
  • Best Win: 77-70 at Michigan on Feb. 24.
  • Worst Loss: 74-79 at Illinois on Feb. 5.
  • The Skinny: The Spartans are rolling having won 10 of 11, three of which came against in-state rival Michigan, including the championship game of the Big Ten post-season tournament. A three-game losing streak between Jan. 27 and Feb. 5 is a distant memory, and Michigan State is also eager to make its second-round exit in last year’s NCAA Tournament against Syracuse a thing of the past.

Bradley

  • Peoria, Ill., 20-14.
  • Nickname: Braves. Coach: Brian Wardle.
  • Conference: Missouri Valley. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: East. Seed: No. 15.
  • Tournament History: 11-8 in 8 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2006, lost to Memphis in the Sweet Sixteen.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 66.6 points per game, 43.4 fg pct, 36.6 3-pt pct, 69.3 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Darrel Brown 14.7; Elijah Childs 12.2; Nate Kennell 9.4.
  • Rebounds: Childs 7.8; Dwayne Lautier-Ogunleye 5.4; Avg team margin (plus-1.2).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (0.95): Brown (3.1/2.4), 104 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 59-56 vs. Penn State on Nov. 21.
  • Worst Loss: 66-73 at home to Eastern Illinois on Dec. 15.
  • The Skinny: The Braves played spoiler in the MVC Tournament when they knocked out 2018 Final Four underdog darling Loyola-Chicago in the semifinals and showed their season-long moxie then they came back from 18 points down in the second to beat Northern Iowa for the title, their eighth victory when trailing at halftime. This is Bradley’s ninth trip to the NCAA Tournament and the first since 2006 when they reached the Sweet Sixteen. Darrell Brown is the leading scorer (14.9) and Elijah Childs (12.1) is second but MVC sixth man of the year Nate Kennell comes off the bench to provide a punch.

MIDWEST REGIONAL

North Carolina's Nassir Little (5) reacts after making a basket against Louisville during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday, March 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Chuck Burton

North Carolina's Nassir Little (5) reacts after making a basket against Louisville during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday, March 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

North Carolina

  • Chapel Hill, 27-6.
  • Nickname: Tar Heels. Coach: Roy Williams.
  • Conference: Atlantic Coast. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 1.
  • Tournament History: 124-46, 20 Final Fours and 6 national championships in 48 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Texas A&M in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 86.1 points per game, 46.4 fg pct, 37.5 3-pt pct, 74.2 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Cameron Johnson 16.9; Coby White 16.3; Luke Maye 14.7.
  • Rebounds: Maye 10.5; Johnson 5.8; Avg team margin (plus-9.7).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.45): White (4.2/2.8), 133 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 88-72 at Duke on Feb. 20.
  • Worst Loss: 89-92 vs. Texas on Nov. 22.
  • The Skinny: The Tar Heels claimed their first regular-season sweep of Duke since 2009, a year that ended with Williams claiming his second NCAA championship. They were trying to beat the Blue Devils three times in a season for the first time since 1976, but Zion Williamson tipped in his own miss to put the fifth-ranked Blue Devils ahead for good, and Duke survived North Carolina’s final-play shot for a 74-73 win in the semifinals.

Iona

  • New Rochelle, N.Y., 17-15.
  • Nickname: Gaels. Coach: Tim Cluess.
  • Conference: Metro Atlantic Athletic. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 16.
  • Tournament History: 1-14 in 14 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Duke in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 76.8 points per game, 45.3 fg pct, 35.1 3-pt pct, 74.1 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: E.J. Crawford 17.9; Rickey McGill 15.5; Tajuan Agee 13.3.
  • Rebounds: Agee 8.1; Crawford 5.1; Avg team margin (minus-2.1).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.06): McGill (5.0/2.8), 159 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 10-0.
  • Best Win: 80-75 vs. Hartford on Nov. 21.
  • Worst Loss: 68-80 at Fairfield on Jan. 27.
  • The Skinny: The Gaels lost nine of their first 11 games this season and, following a 66-65 loss — their fourth in a row — to Quinnipiac on Feb. 8, Iona was 7-15 overall, 5-6 in conference play. The Gaels have since won 10 consecutive games including an 81-60 win over Monmouth in the championship game to clinch their MAAC-record fourth title in a row. Iona has just two returners from last-year’s squad — senior Rickey McGill, the MAAC tournament MVP and a first-team all-conference selection, and junior E.J. Crawford, the team’s leading scorer.

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Utah State

  • Logan, 28-6.
  • Nickname: Aggies. Coach: Craig Smith.
  • Conference: Mountain West. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 8.
  • Tournament History: 6-22, in 20 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2011, lost to Kansas State in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 79.1 points per game, 47.4 fg pct, 35.5 3-pt pct, 74.7 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Sam Merrill 21.2; Neemias Queta 11.9; Diogo Brito 8.3.
  • Rebounds: Queta 8.9; Quinn Taylor 6.2; Avg team margin (plus-8.9).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.37): Merrill (4.2/1.8), 144 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 10-0.
  • Best Win: 81-76 at home to Nevada on March 2.
  • Worst Loss: 77-78 at home to Fresno State on Jan. 9.
  • The Skinny: The Aggies won their first Mountain West Conference title, beating San Diego State in the title game, under first-year coach Craig Smith to return to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2011.

Washington

  • Seattle, 26-8.
  • Nickname: Huskies. Coach: Mike Hopkins.
  • Conference: Pac 12. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 9.
  • Tournament History: 18-17, 1 Final Four in 16 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2011, lost to North Carolina in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 69.8 points per game, 45.3 fg pct, 34.6 3-pt pct, 69.4 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Jaylen Nowell 16.2; David Crisp 12.5; Noah Dickerson 12.2.
  • Rebounds: Dickerson 7.4; Nowell 5.3; Avg team margin (minus-2.6).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (0.87): Nowell (3.1/2.9), 106 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 61-55 at Oregon on Jan. 24.
  • Worst Loss: 73-76 at Cal on Feb. 28.
  • The Skinny: The Huskies, who are making their first appearance in the NCAA Tournament since 2011, are hobbling into the postseason despite winning the regular-season conference title. They closed the month of February with loss to California — the Golden Bears’ only conference win this season — scored a season-low 47 points in a loss to Oregon in the regular-season finale and shot 33 percent from the field in a 68-48 loss to the Ducks in the Pac-12 championship game. Second-year coach Mike Hopkins has Washington suffocating opposing offenses with its 2-3 zone. The Dawgs rank No. 9 nationally in steals per game (9.0) — led by Matisse Thybulle’s Division I-leading 3.44 — and are 30th in scoring defense, allowing just 64.4 points per game.

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Auburn

  • Auburn, Ala., 26-9.
  • Nickname: Tigers. Coach: Bruce Pearl.
  • Conference: Southeastern. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 5.
  • Tournament History: 13-9 in 9 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Clemson in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 79.4 points per game, 44.9 fg pct, 37.6 3-pt pct, 71.0 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Bryce Brown 15.7; Jared Harper 15.4; Chuma Okeke 11.6.
  • Rebounds: Okeke 6.6; Austin Wiley 4.5; Avg team margin (minus-0.6).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.18): Harper (5.8/2.3), 196 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1.
  • Best Win: 84-80 at home to Tennessee on March 9.
  • Worst Loss: 77-80 at South Carolina on Jan. 22.
  • The Skinny: The SEC post-season champs are riding an eight-game win streak that includes two wins, 84-80 and 84-64, over Tennessee. Their 20-point win against the Volunteers in the championship game marks their first SEC tourney title since 1985. The Tigers hadn’t played in the title game since 2000. Auburn is 3-5 this season against teams that were ranked in the Top 25 at the time they played.

New Mexico State

  • Las Cruces, 30-4.
  • Nickname: Aggies. Coach: Chris Jans.
  • Conference: Western Athletic. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 12.
  • Tournament History: 10-26, 1 Final Four in 24 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Clemson in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 78.1 points per game, 45.9 fg pct, 33.5 3-pt pct, 67.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Terrell Brown 11.3; Eli Chuhu 9.8; AJ Harris 9.6.
  • Rebounds: Chuha 6.7; Ivan Aurrecoechea 5.1; Avg team margin (plus-9.6).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.24): Harris (3.4/1.5), 108 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 10-0.
  • Best Win: 83-78 at Utah Valley on Jan. 19.
  • Worst Loss: 76-82 at California Baptist on Jan. 3.
  • The Skinny: The Aggies, who won 28 games in each of the last two seasons, have won a program-record 30 games heading into their third consecutive NCAA Tournament appearance and seventh in the last eight years. Second-year coach Chris Jans uses a long, experienced rotation with 13 players (11 of which are upper-classmen) averaging more than 10 minutes per game and none averaging as many as 26. NMSU ranks No. 3 nationally in rebound margin (plus-9.6), No. 11 in scoring margin (plus-14.0) and No. 26 in scoring defense (64.1 points per game).

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Kansas

  • Lawrence, 25-9.
  • Nickname: Jayhawks. Coach: Bill Self.
  • Conference: Big 12. Bid: At Large
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 4.
  • Tournament History: 107-46, 14 Final Fours and 3 National Championships in 47 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Villanova in the Final Four.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 75.4 points per game, 46.2 fg pct, 35.0 3-pt pct, 69.7 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Dedric Lawson 19.1; Lagerald Vick 14.1; Udoka Azubuike 13.4.
  • Rebounds: Lawson 10.3; Azubuike 6.8; Avg team margin (plus-2.5).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.00): Devon Dotson (3.6/2.3), 122 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 87-81 vs. Tennessee on Nov. 23.
  • Worst Loss: 64-65 at West Virginia on Jan. 19.
  • The Skinny: Only in a place like Lawrence is a 25-win season, a top 20-ranking and an 8-3 record against Top 25 opponents considered a less than ideal season. Such are expectations are appearing in the Final Four a year ago. But don’t dismiss the Jayhawks. Despite a 78-66 defeat in the Big 12 Conference championship game, Kansas is 9-4 since February and more recently have won eight of its last 11.

Northeastern

  • Boston, 23-10.
  • Nickname: Huskies. Coach: Bill Coen.
  • Conference: Colonial Athletic Association. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 13.
  • Tournament History: 3-8, in 8 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 1991, lost to North Carolina in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 76.1 points per game, 48.2 fg pct, 38.8 3-pt pct, 75.1 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Vasa Pusica 17.8; Jordan Roland 14.7; Shawn Occeus 10.1.
  • Rebounds: Bolden Brace 6.0; Anthony Green 5.4; Avg team margin (plus-0.1).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.27): Pusica (4.2/3.2), 110 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1
  • Best Win: 82-74 vs, Hofstra on March 12.
  • Worst Loss: 72-75 at Towson on Jan. 24.
  • The Skinny: The Huskies have lost their last six NCAA openers but back in 1981 and 1982 advanced to the second round by knocking off a sixth-seeded team. Leading scorer Pusica was the CAA tournament MVP when Northeastern knocked off league champion Hofstra. He hit 7 of 12 3s in that game. The battle-test Huskies survived losing all of an 18-point lead, something they learned when losing a 17-point lead in the title game the year before.

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Iowa State

  • Ames, 23-11.
  • Nickname: Cyclones. Coach: Steve Prohm.
  • Conference: Big 12. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 6.
  • Tournament History: 19-19, 1 final Four in 19 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2017, lost to Purdue in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 77.4 points per game, 47.7 fg pct, 36.5 3-pt pct, 73.2 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Marial Shayok 18.6; Lindell Wigginton 13.5; Talen Horton-Tucker 12.1.
  • Rebounds: Michael Jacobson 6.0; Horton-Tucker 5.0; Avg team margin (plus-0.6).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.37): Nick Weiler-Babb (4.0/1.6), 136 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 5-5.
  • Best Win: 78-66 vs. Kansas on March 16.
  • Worst Loss: 66-71 vs. Arizona on Nov. 19.
  • The Skinny: The Cyclones, a No. 5-seed entering the Big 12 Conference tournament, became the lowest seeded team in post-season play to ever win out and clinch an automatic bid. Iowa State sat at 18-5 before losing six of eight games to end regular-season play. Iowa State could be primed to make a deeper-than expected run as the Cyclones have a 6-3 record against Top 25 opponents this season.

Ohio State

  • Columbus, 19-14.
  • Nickname: Buckeyes. Coach: Chris Holtmann.
  • Conference: Big Ten. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 11.
  • Tournament History: 56-31, 11 Final Fours and 1 National Championship in 31 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Gonzaga in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 69.6 points per game, 43.7 fg pct, 34.3 3-pt pct, 73.4 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Kaleb Wesson 14.4; C.J. Jackson 12.2; Andre Wesson 8.8.
  • Rebounds: K. Wesson 6.8; Kyle Young 4.6; Avg team margin (plus-1.3).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.14): Jackson (3.5/2.3), 113 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 3-7.
  • Best Win: 64-56 at Cincinnati on Nov. 7.
  • Worst Loss: 50-68 at Northwestern on March 6.
  • The Skinny: Ohio State lost to eventual Big Ten tournament champion Michigan State 77-70 in the quarterfinals for its fifth loss in its last seven games. Sophomore Kaleb Wesson, leading the Buckeyes in both scoring and rebounding, was named to the honorable mention All-Big Ten team. The Buckeyes have four wins in nine games this season against teams that made the 2018 NCAA Tournament, including two wins on the road against Cincinnati and Creighton. Ohio State also played nine games against teams currently ranked in the Top 25 poll.

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Houston

  • Houston, 31-3.
  • Nickname: Cougars. Coach: Kelvin Sampson.
  • Conference: American Athletic. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 3.
  • Tournament History: 27-25, 5 Final Fours in 20 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Michigan in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 76.2 points per game, 44.9 fg pct, 36.4 3-pt pct, 70.4 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Corey Davis Jr. 16.8; Armoni Brooks 13.5; Dejon Jarreau 9.0.
  • Rebounds: Brooks 6.6; Nate Hinton 4.5; Avg team margin (plus-7.7).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.31): Galen Robinson Jr. (5.0/1.7), 166 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 82-76 at home to LSU on Dec. 12.
  • Worst Loss: 69-73 at Temple on Jan. 9.
  • The Skinny: Not since the days of Phi Slama Jama in the early 1980s has the program seen a squad post more than 30 wins and reach the NCAA Tournament in back-to-back seasons. Despite losing to No. 24 Cincinnati in the AAC title game, the Cougars went 3-1 against Top 25 competition. Houston also boasts an 82-76 home win against LSU, which occurred nine games into the season before the Tigers were ranked. Houston beat the Bearcats twice and Pac-12 tournament champ Oregon, 65-61, when the Ducks owned a No. 18 ranking.

Georgia State

  • Atlanta, 24-9.
  • Nickname: Panthers. Coach: Ron Hunter
  • Conference: Sun Belt. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 14.
  • Tournament History: 2-4 in 4 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Cincinnati in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 77.2 points per game, 46.6 fg pct, 38.8 3-pt pct, 65.9 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: D’Marcus Simonds 18.7; Devin Mitchell 12.4; Jeff Thomas 12.0.
  • Rebounds: Malik Benlevi 5.7; Simonds 4.9; Avg team margin (minus-6.2).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.07): D’Marcus Simonds (3.7/3.8), 119 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 83-80 at Alabama on Dec. 4.
  • Worst Loss: 75-77 at Troy on Jan. 19.
  • The Skinny: The Sun Belt’s regular season and conference champions are riding a five-game winning streak into the tournament. The Panthers are the only team in the country with four players to make 50 or more 3-pointers this season. Georgia State has the second-most wins in the country without a loss when leading at the half. Gonzaga leads the nation with 25. The Panthers went 2-3 against opponents this season, all on the road, who competed in last year’s NCAA Tournament.

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Wofford

  • Spartanburg, S.C., 29-4.
  • Nickname: Terriers. Coach: Mike Young.
  • Conference: Southern. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 7.
  • Tournament History: 0-4, 4 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2014, lost to Michigan in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 83.0 points per game, 49.3 fg pct, 41.6 3-pt pct, 69.9 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Fletcher Magee 20.5; Cameron Jackson 14.6; Nathan Hoover 13.3.
  • Rebounds: Jackson 7.5; Keve Aluma 6.8; Avg team margin (plus-6.5).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.40): Storm Murphy (3.2/1.3), 103 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 10-0.
  • Best Win: 72-43 at NC-Greensboro on Jan. 10.
  • Worst Loss: 64-75 at Oklahoma on Nov. 18.
  • The Skinny: The No. 20 Terriers have won 20 games in a row and their four losses this season all came against NCAA Tournament teams from Power 5 conferences (No. 3 North Carolina, No. 17 Kansas, then-No. 17 Mississippi State and Oklahoma). Wofford became just the third team in Southern Conference history to sweep conference play with at least a 16-game regular season — even more impressive when you figure that four SoCon teams won at least 24 games this season. The Terriers are led by two-time conference player of the year Fletcher McGee, who leads Division I with 4.6 made 3s per game while shooting 42.8 percent from behind the arc.

Seton Hall

  • South Orange, N.J., 20-13.
  • Nickname: Pirates. Coach: Kevin Willard.
  • Conference: Big East. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 10.
  • Tournament History: 16-12, 1 Final Four in 12 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Kansas in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 73.9 points per game, 44.1 fg pct, 32.4 3-pt pct, 70.8 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Myles Powell 22.9; Myles Cale 10.3; Quincy McKnight 9.5.
  • Rebounds: Sandro Mamukelashvili 7.8; Michael Nzei 5.3; Avg team margin (minus-0.2).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.09): McKnight (4.0/2.5), 131 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 6-4.
  • Best Win: 84-83 vs. Kentucky on Dec. 8.
  • Worst Loss: 93-97 at home to DePaul on Jan. 19.
  • The Skinny: Seton Hall lost to Villanova in the Big East tournament championship game as the Wildcats became the first team to win it three consecutive seasons. Villanova has won four of the last five championships with the only loss during the span to Seton Hall in 2016. The Pirates are headed to their fourth straight NCAA Tournament, matching a school best (1991-94).

Kentucky

  • Lexington, 27-6.
  • Nickname: Wildcats. Coach: John Calipari.
  • Conference: Southeastern. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 2.
  • Tournament History: 126-51, 17 Final Fours and eight national championships in 58 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Kansas State in the Sweet Sixteen.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 76.7 points per game, 47.8 fg pct, 36.4 3-pt pct, 74.0 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: PJ Washington 14.8; Tyler Herro 14.2; Keldon Johnson 13.4.
  • Rebounds: Washington 7.5; Reid Travis 6.9; Avg team margin (plus-9.0).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.10): Ashton Hagans (4.5/2.4), 148 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best win: 71-63 at home to Kansas on Jan. 26.
  • Worst loss: 75-77 at Alabama on Jan. 5.
  • The Skinny: The Wildcats were in the hunt for a No. 1 seed until losing to Tennessee in the SEC semifinals. Not too bad considering the season started with a 118-84 loss to Duke. Reid Travis, who missed several weeks with a sprained right knee, returned for the tournament and played back-to-back games, scoring 11 points in a start in the last game. Kentucky beat Tennessee by 17 when the Vols were No. 1 but lost by 19 late in the regular season before losing by four in the league tourney.

Abilene Christian

  • Abilene, Texas, 27-6.
  • Nickname: Wildcats. Coach: Joe Golding.
  • Conference: Southland. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 15.
  • Tournament History: First appearance.
  • Last appearance: First.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 74.5 points per game, 47.4 fg pct, 38.6 3-pt pct, 71.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Jaren Lewis 13.7; Jalone Friday 13.1; Payten Ricks 11.7.
  • Rebounds: Lewis 6.2; B.J. Maxwell 4.7; Avg team margin (plus-1.7).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.30): Jaylen Franklin (4.9/2.1), 163 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 83-68 at home to Campbell on Dec. 4.
  • Worst Loss: 60-61 at Stephen F. Austin on Jan. 23.
  • The Skinny: The Wildcats are making their first-ever NCAA Tournament appearance after six years of competing at the Division I level. AC is riding a six-game winning streak and has a 15-3 record since the start of the new year. Their 27 wins heading into the tournament is tied for the most wins in a season in program history. The Wildcats’ offense is done by committee as Jaren Lewis, Jalone Friday, Payten Ricks and Jaylen Franklin each average double figures.

SOUTH REGIONAL

Virginia coach Tony Bennett argues a call during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Florida State in the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament in Charlotte, N.C., Friday, March 15, 2019. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Chuck Burton

Virginia coach Tony Bennett argues a call during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Florida State in the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament in Charlotte, N.C., Friday, March 15, 2019. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Virginia

  • Charlottesville, 29-3.
  • Nickname: Cavaliers. Coach: Tony Bennett.
  • Conference: Atlantic Coast. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 1.
  • Tournament History: 29-22, 2 Final Fours in 22 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to UMBC in the First Round.
  • Season Stats::
  • Scoring: 71.8 points per game, 47.8 fg pct, 8.5 3-pt pct, 74.6 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Kyle Guy 15.6; De’Andre Hunter 15.1; Ty Jerome 13.0.
  • Rebounds: Braxton Key 5.5; Hunter 5.0; Avg team margin (plus-4.9).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.61): Jerome (5.4/1.6), 166 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 9-1.
  • Best Win: 69-61 at North Carolina on Feb. 11.
  • Worst Loss: 59-69 vs. Florida State on March 15.
  • The Skinny: The Cavaliers have won or shared four of the last six ACC regular-season titles, including each of the last two. Coach Tony Bennett’s squad is known for its defense — Virginia leads the nation in scoring defense at 55.1 points per game (the only team allowing fewer than 58) and is No. 4 in field-goal percentage defense (.380) — but is, perhaps, better known for becoming the only No. 1 seed in NCAA Tournament history to lose to a No. 16 seed after falling to 74-54 to UMBC in 2018. UVA’s only losses this season have come against Duke (twice), the ACC Tournament champion, and No. 12 Florida State (in the ACC semifinals).

Gardner-Webb

  • Boiling Springs, N.C., 23-11.
  • Nickname: Runnin’ Bulldogs. Coach: Tim Craft.
  • Conference: Big South. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: South Seed: No. 16.
  • Tournament History: First Appearance.
  • Last appearance: First.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 78.3 points per game, 48.8 fg pct, 39.1 3-pt pct, 71.1 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: David Efianayi 18.4; Jose Perez 15.0; DJ Laster 13.7.
  • Rebounds: Perez 5.8; Laster 5.5; Avg team margin (minus-0.7).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.26): Perez (3.0/2.0), 102 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2
  • Best Win: 76-65 at Radford on March 10.
  • Worst Loss: 78-79 vs. Eastern Illinois on Nov. 23.
  • The Skinny: The school that gave the basketball world Artis Gilmore and John Drew before the Runnin’ Bulldogs moved up to Division I in 2000 is making its first NCAA Tournament appearance after the fourth-seeded squad took down No. 2 seed Radford in the title game behind a career-high 32 points from senior forward DJ Laster, who filled up the basket amid the offensive struggles of David Efianayi, the Bulldogs’ top scorer in their Division I history. Efianayi shot nearly 50 percent this season in averaging 18.5 ppg and 43 percent from the arc. Freshman swingman Jose Perez (15.1 points, 5.7 rebounds, 3.0 assists) has been a sterling addition.

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Mississippi

  • Oxford, 20-12.
  • Nickname: Rebels. Coach: Kermit Davis Jr.
  • Conference: Southeastern. Bid: At Large
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 8.
  • Tournament History: 5-8, in 8 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2015, lost to Xavier in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 76.0 points per game, 46.2 fg pct, 36.1 3-pt pct, 78.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Breein Tyree 18.2; Terence Davis 15.1; Devontae Shuler 10.2.
  • Rebounds: Davis 5.8; Bruce Stevens 4.4; Avg team margin (plus-2.3).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.13): Davis (3.4/2.8), 108 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 5-5.
  • Best Win: 81-77 at Mississippi State on Jan. 12.
  • Worst Loss: 73-74 at Arkansas on March 2.
  • The Skinny: Ole Miss, under first-year coach Kermit Davis, returns to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2015. It is often said that good guard play wins games in March and the Rebels rely heavily on their backcourt of Terence Davis, Breein Tyree and Devontae Shuler. That trio combines to average 43.5 points, 13.0 rebounds, 9.3 assists and 4.4 steals per game. Unfortunately, defense is critical to an extended run and Mississippi rank last in the SEC in field-goal percentage defense (.441) and 3-point field-goal percentage defense (.372).

Oklahoma

  • Norman, 19-13.
  • Nickname: Sooners. Coach: Lon Kruger.
  • Conference: Big 12 Bid: At Large.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 9.
  • Tournament History: 41-31, 5 Final Fours in 30 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Rhode Island in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 71.2 points per game, 44.5 fg pct, 34.2 3-pt pct, 69.1 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Christian James 14.4; Brady Manek 12.0; Kristian Doolittle 11.2.
  • Rebounds: Doolittle 7.0; James 6.3; Avg team margin (plus-0.5).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.04): Jamal Bieniemy (3.5/1.3), 112 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 4-6.
  • Best Win: 81-68 at home to Kansas on March 5.
  • Worst Loss: 71-72 vs. West Virginia on March 13.
  • The Skinny: Oklahoma fell to West Virginia 72-71 in the first round of the Big 12 tournament when the Sooners’ Christian James, who appeared to knock down a buzzer-beating 3-pointer to force overtime, was determined to have had his foot on the line. The officials overturned their original call. The Sooners have four quadrant-1 wins and a strong resume against quality opponents, but went 7-11 in the league. A win over Kansas down the stretch also helped.

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Wisconsin

  • Madison, 23-10.
  • Nickname: Badgers. Coach: Greg Gard.
  • Conference: Colonial Athletic Association. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 5.
  • Tournament History: 38-22, 4 Final Fours and 1 National Championship in 23 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2017, lost to Florida in the Sweet Sixteen.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 69.5 points per game, 45.7 fg pct, 37.4 3-pt pct, 65.0 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Ethan Happ 17.4; D’Mitrik Trice 11.8; Brad Davison 10.9.
  • Rebounds: Happ 10.3; Khalil Iverson 4.5; Avg team margin (plus-0.1).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.33): Happ (4.7/3.1), 150 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 6-4.
  • Best Win: 64-54 at home to Michigan on Jan. 19.
  • Worst Loss: 73-75 at Indiana on Feb. 26.
  • The Skinny: The No. 19 Badgers made it to the Big Ten Tournament semifinals before losing 67-55 to No. 6 Michigan State. Nine of Wisconsin’s 10 losses this season were by single digits. The Badgers missed the NCAA Tournament last season for the first time since 1998.

Oregon

  • Eugene, 23-12.
  • Nickname: Ducks. Coach: Dana Altman.
  • Conference: Pac 12. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 12.
  • Tournament History: 23-14, 2 Final Fours in 15 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2017, lost to North in the Final Four.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 70.5 points per game, 45.0 fg pct, 34.3 3-pt pct, 71.9 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Bol Bol 21.0; Louis King 13.1; Payton Pritchard 12.7.
  • Rebounds: Bol 9.6; King 5.7; Avg team margin (plus-1.7).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.13): Pritchard (4.5/1.9), 156 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 62-52 at home to VCU on Nov. 28.
  • Worst Loss: 73-80 at Florida Atlantic on Jan. 10.
  • The Skinny: The Ducks, who came into the season ranked No. 14, missed the NCAA Tournament last year for the first time since 2012. Three weeks ago, on the heels of a three-game skid capped by a 90-83 loss at UCLA that dropped Oregon to 15-12, it appeared as if coach Dana Altman’s team would miss the Big Dance again in 2019. The Ducks, however, won four games in as many days to win the Pac-12 Tournament to extend their win streak to eight games. Defense has keyed the resurgence as, since the 90-83 loss to the Bruins on Feb. 23, Oregon has limited its opponents to just 54.2 points per game on 34.6-percent (143 of 413) shooting.

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Kansas State

  • Manhattan, 25-8.
  • Nickname: Wildcats. Coach: Bruce Weber.
  • Conference: Big 12. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 4.
  • Tournament History: 36-34, 4 Final Fours in 29 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Loyola-Chicago in the Elite Eight.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 65.8 points per game, 43.1 fg pct, 33.6 3-pt pct, 66.4 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Barry Brown Jr. 14.9; Dean Wade 12.9; Kamau Stokes 10.8.
  • Rebounds: Wade 6.2; Sneed 5.5; Avg team margin (plus-1.2).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.22): Stokes (3.3/1.8), 106 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3
  • Best Win: 74-67 at home to Kansas on Feb. 5.
  • Worst Loss: 53-65 at Texas A&M on Jan. 26.
  • The Skinny: The co-Big 12 regular season champion is clearly of the mind it can duplicate last year’s run to the Elite Eight, which included a 50-43 win over No. 16-seed darling UMBC in the second round. More conversation in the state, and nationally, centers more around what their high profile, in-state rival hasn’t done this year than what the Wildcats have done. And that includes posting a 10-3 record since February.

UC Irvine

  • Irvine, Calif., 30-5.
  • Nickname: Anteaters. Coach: Russell Turner.
  • Conference: Big West. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 13.
  • Tournament History: 0-1, in 1 appearance.
  • Last appearance: 2015, lost to Louisville in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 72.9 points per game, 45.9 fg pct, 36.1 3-pt pct, 69.6 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Max Hazzard 12.5; Evan Leonard 11.1; Collin Welp 8.9.
  • Rebounds: Jonathan Galloway 8.0; Elston Jones 6.8; Avg team margin (plus-7.3).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.13): Eyassu Worku (2.8/1.8), 84 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 10-0.
  • Best Win: 80-75 at Saint Mary’s on Nov. 28.
  • Worst Loss: 70-80 at home to Long Beach State on Jan. 16.
  • The Skinny: Coach Russell Turner, who won 25 combined games in his first two seasons (2010-11 and ’11-12) at UC Irvine, led the Anteaters to a program-record 30 wins (so far) this season and their second-ever berth in the Big Dance. They have wins over Montana and at Saint Mary’s — both NCAA Tournament teams — and come into the tourney on a 16-game win streak. UCI ranks fifth nationally in field-goal percentage defense (.380), ninth in rebound margin (plus-7.3) and 19th in scoring defense (63.3 points per game).

___

Villanova

  • Philadelphia, 25-9.
  • Nickname: Wildcats. Coach: Jay Wright.
  • Conference: Big East. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 6
  • Tournament History: 64-36, 6 Final Fours and 3 National Championships in 38 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, beat Michigan in the National Championship.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 74.5 points per game, 43.9 fg pct, 35.3 3-pt pct, 72.7 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Phil Booth 18.6; Eric Paschall 16.5; Collin Gillespie 11.1.
  • Rebounds: Paschall 6.2; Dhamir Cosby-Roundtree 5.9; Avg team margin (plus-2.5).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.26): Booth (3.8/2.3), 129 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 6-4.
  • Best Win: 66-60 vs. Florida State on Nov. 25.
  • Worst Loss: 75-78 at Penn on Dec. 11.
  • The Skinny: The Wildcats won national championship in 2016 and 2018 and average 34 wins over the last four seasons. Villanova lost seven players from last year’s squad, including four to the NBA draft. After struggling (by its own ridiculous standards), including losing four of five games in the middle of February, Nova has won five of its last six and claimed its third consecutive Big East Tournament title. The Wildcats are led by a pair of seniors: guard Phil Booth and forward Eric Paschall, who combine to average more than 35 points per game.

Saint Mary’s

  • Moraga, Calif., 22-11.
  • Nickname: Gaels. Coach: Randy Bennett.
  • Conference: West Coast. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 11.
  • Tournament History: 6-11 in 12 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2017, lost to Arizona in the second round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 72.9 points per game, 47.4 fg pct, 37.8 3-pt pct, 74.5 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Jordan Ford 21.3; Malik Fitts 15.3; Tanner Krebs 8.9.
  • Rebounds: Fitts 7.6; Jordan Hunter 6.8; Avg team margin (plus-5.5).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (0.95): Tommy Kuhse (2.9/1.6), 95 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2
  • Best Win: 60-47 vs. Gonzaga on March 12.
  • Worst Loss: 77-84 vs. Pepperdine on Jan. 26.
  • The Skinny: The Gaels, somewhat surprisingly, return to the NCAA Tournament after a one-year absence thanks to a decisive win over then-No. 1 Gonzaga, in the West Coast Conference tournament championship game — their first title since 2012. Saint Mary’s lost five of its top seven scorers and three starters from last year’s squad that won 30 games and lost in the quarterfinals of the NIT but has won seven of its last eight games with the only loss coming against Gonzaga. During that stretch, the Gaels have allowed their opponents to score just 51.3 points per game on 38.1-percent shooting. For the season, Saint Mary’s is giving up 64.4 points per game (No. 29 nationally) with a plus-5.5 rebound margin (No. 26).

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Purdue

  • West Lafayette, Ind., 23-9.
  • Nickname: Boilermakers. Coach: Matt Painter.
  • Conference: Big Ten. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 3.
  • Tournament History: 39-30, 2 Final Fours in 29 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Texas Tech in the Sweet Sixteen.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 76.2 points per game, 44.6 fg pct, 36.6 3-pt pct, 73.2 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Carsen Edwards 23.0; Ryan Cline 11.9; Matt Haarms 9.0.
  • Rebounds: Nojel Eastern 5.8; Haarms 5.4; Avg team margin (plus-5.2).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.35): Cline (3.3/1.3), 107 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 7-3.
  • Best Win: 73-63 at home to Michigan State on Jan. 27.
  • Worst Loss: 80-88 vs. Notre Dame on Dec. 15.
  • The Skinny: Despite a two-point loss to Minnesota in the quarterfinals of the Big Ten tournament, the conference co-champion Boilermakers won 14 of their last 17 games. Two of those losses were to the Golden Gophers, who earned a 10 seed, with the other loss at No. 24 Maryland, now a six-seed. Carsen Edwards is the third Purdue player in nine years to lead the league in scoring, the only school with more than one scoring leader. Edwards averaged 23.5 points but only shot 11 of 48 in the two recent losses to Minnesota. These Boilermakers are also the conference in 3-point shooting.

Old Dominion

  • Norfolk, Va., 26-8.
  • Nickname: Monarchs. Coach: Jeff Jones.
  • Conference: C-USA. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 14.
  • Tournament History: 3-11, in 11 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2011, lost to Butler in the First Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 66.2 points per game, 41.1 fg pct, 35.3 3-pt pct, 66.0 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: B.J. Stith 16.9; Ahmad Caver 16.5; Xavier Green 9.7.
  • Rebounds: Stith 7.4; Aaron Carver 6.0; Avg team margin (plus-4.9).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.09): Caver (5.6/2.2), 191 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 62-52 at home to VCU on Nov. 28.
  • Worst Loss: 73-80 at Florida Atlantic on Jan. 10.
  • The Skinny: Old Dominion made its first NCAA Tournament since 2011. ODU needed two big comeback wins to reach the Conference USA’s title game against Western Kentucky. Ahmad Caver made a fall-away 3-pointer with 3.3 seconds left to top Louisiana Tech and Xavier Green made a one-handed shot while being fouled with four seconds left to lift ODU past UAB. Top-seeded Old Dominion, the eighth-stingiest scoring defense in the latest NCAA statistics (61.2 points per game), won three tournament games by a total of nine points.

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Cincinnati

  • Cincinnati, 28-6.
  • Nickname: Bearcats. Coach: Mick Cronin.
  • Conference: American Athletic. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 7.
  • Tournament History: 46-31, 6 Final Fours and 2 national championships in 32 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2018, lost to Nevada in Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 71.7 points per game, 43.2 fg pct, 35.0 3-pt pct, 70.4 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Jarron Cumberland 18.4; Keith Williams 10.2; Tre Scott 9.2.
  • Rebounds: Scott 6.8; Nysier Brooks 6.3; Avg team margin (plus-5.2).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.28): Cumberland (3.7/2.8), 122 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 8-2.
  • Best Win: 60-55 at home to UCF on Feb. 21.
  • Worst Loss: 71-73 at East Carolina on Jan. 5.
  • The Skinny: The Bearcats’ 89 wins since the start of the 2016-17 season are the most in any three-year stretch in school history and are third most in the nation behind only Gonzaga (99) and Villanova (93). The Bearcats have rallied to win seven times when trailing by eight or more points. Cincinnati’s AAC quarterfinals win over SMU gave the Bearcats at least 26 wins in a season for the sixth time in the last nine years.

Iowa

  • Iowa City, 22-11.
  • Nickname: Hawkeyes. Coach: Fran McCaffery.
  • Conference: Big Ten. Bid: At Large.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 10.
  • Tournament History: 29-27, 3 Final Fours in 25 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2016, lost to Villanova in the Second Round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 78.3 points per game, 45.5 fg pct, 36.1 3-pt pct, 74.0 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Tyler Cook 14.9; Luke Garza 12.9; Jordan Bohannon 11.3.
  • Rebounds: Cook 7.9; Joe Wieskamp 4.8; Avg team margin (plus-1.1).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.29): Bohannon (3.4/1.7), 113 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 4-6.
  • Best Win: 74-59 at home to Michigan on Feb. 1.
  • Worst Loss: 72-86 at home to Rutgers on March 2.
  • The Skinny: The Hawkeyes limp in the NCAA Tournament losers of five of their last six games, including a 74-53 drubbing by No. 10 Michigan in the Big Ten quarterfinals. Despite Iowa’s recent struggles, coach Fran McCaffery’s team has home wins against the aforementioned Wolverines (by 15 points) and Iowa State, the Big 12 Tournament champion, as well as a neutral-site win over Pac-12 champ Oregon. The Hawkeyes can beat you inside, with forwards Tyler Cook and Luka Garza, or outside, where Joe Wieskamp, Isaiah Moss and Jordan Bohannon have combined to shoot better than 40 percent from behind the arc and average 5.3 made 3s per game.

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Tennessee

  • Knoxville, 29-5.
  • Nickname: Volunteers. Coach: Rick Barnes.
  • Conference: Southeastern. Bid: At large.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 2.
  • Tournament History: 19-21 in 20 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 2014, lost to Michigan in the Sweet Sixteen.
  • Season Stats:
  • Scoring: 82.3 points per game, 49.8 fg pct, 35.8 3-pt pct, 76.2 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Grant Williams 19.2; Admiral Schofield 16.6; Jordan Bone 13.5.
  • Rebounds: Williams 7.5; Alexander 6.6; Avg team margin (plus-3.7).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.68): Bone (6.2/2.0), 203 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 6-4.
  • Best Win: 76-73 vs. Gonzaga on Dec. 9.
  • Worst Loss: 80-84 at Auburn on March 9.
  • The Skinny: The Volunteers are making back-to-back trips to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since appearing in six straight from 2006-2011. In January, they moved into the top spot of the of the AP poll — a spot they held for four weeks — for the first time since the 2007-08 campaign and for the second time in program history. All of Tennessee’s five losses this season have come against ranked teams and the Vols have three wins against Top-5 teams (No. 1 Gonzaga and two against No. 5 Kentucky).

Colgate

  • Hamilton, N.Y., 24-10.
  • Nickname: Raiders. Coach: Matt Langel.
  • Conference: Patriot League. Bid: Automatic.
  • Region: South. Seed: No. 15.
  • Tournament History: 0-2 in 2 appearances.
  • Last appearance: 1996, lost to UConn in the first round.
  • Season Stats:
  • Team Scoring: 75.8 points per game, 48.0 fg pct, 38.8 3-pt pct, 74.1 ft pct.
  • Top Scorers: Rapolas Ivanauskas 16.4; Jordan Burns 15.8; Will Rayman 13.1.
  • Rebounds: Ivanauskas 7.9; Rayman 6.5; Avg team margin (plus-4.0).
  • Assist/Turnover Ratio (1.20): Burns (5.8/3.0), 167 assists.
  • Last 10 Games: 10-0.
  • Best Win: 75-64 at home to Bucknell on Feb. 19.
  • Worst Loss: 72-79 at Loyola-Maryland on Jan. 26.
  • The Skinny: The Raiders are riding a school-record 11-game winning streak into their first tournament since 1996, thanks on 35 points from Jordan Burns in a 94-80 win over Bucknell in the Patriot League title game. In their two appearances, both in consecutive years, Colgate was a 16-seed. In 96 the team was led by future first-round NBA draft pick Adonal Foyle. The only postseason appearance since then was the CBI last year.

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